• Short Summary

    INTRODUCTION: Swedish Prime Minister Thorbjoern Faelldin on Thursday (5 November) accused the Soviet Union of carrying nuclear weapons materials on board their submarine which went aground in Swedish waters last weeks.

  • Description

    1.
    SV INTERIOR Swedish cabinet room, members seated.
    0.21

    2.
    SV EXTERIOR Soviet ambassador Mikhail Jakovlev in Stockholm answering questions in Russian.
    1.41

    3.
    SV Swedish Prime Minister Faelldin speaking in Swedish.
    2.04




    Initials JS





    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: INTRODUCTION: Swedish Prime Minister Thorbjoern Faelldin on Thursday (5 November) accused the Soviet Union of carrying nuclear weapons materials on board their submarine which went aground in Swedish waters last weeks. The change came after an emergency meeting of the cabinet which heard a report on the incident from Swedish armed forces chiefs.

    SYNOPSIS: The government leaders gathered at the cabinet room in Stockholm to hear the report. The Soviet submarine that went aground off the Swedish naval port of Karlskrona ten days ago was searched by navy officials. The cabinet heard how the Swedish investigators found nuclear weapons materials on board.

    The incidents has intensely embarrassed the Soviet Union. Their ambassador, Mikhail Jakovlev, was summoned to the Swedish Foreign Ministry to hear a sharply-worded protest from Foreign Minister Ola Ullsten. Soviet authorities originally claimed the elderly submarine strayed off-course before running aground. However, its arrival in Swedish territorial waters coincided with anti-submarine system tests mounted by the Swedish navy in the Karlskrona area. since then, Moscow has allowed the Swedes to interrogate submarine's captain. He maintained his vessel ran aground due to a malfunctioning of the submarine navigation equipment during a routine training exercise. But neither the captain, nor the Soviet government, could give Stockholm a satisfactory explanation why the submarine had turned up in the area. Disclosures about the nuclear weapons on board were considered another setback for Moscow. The Soviet navy, whose ships have been anchored in international waters nearby, was to have the submarine returned by Swedish tugs as soon as the weather cleared. The vessel's 56 crew-members were expected to be returned after their interrogation.

    Swedish Prime Minister Thorbjoern Faelldin gave the news of the nuclear weapons materials at a news conference. He said it was probable there had been one, or more, nuclear warheads on the submarine when it went aground. The Prime Minister demanded that the Soviet government clarify whether or not nuclear weapons were on board.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA1094OLKO9Z22ATP66X10TS7L8
    Media URN:
    VLVA1094OLKO9Z22ATP66X10TS7L8
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    05/11/1981
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:05:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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