• Short Summary

    INTRODUCTION: A car partly controlled by word of mouth - especially adapted for disabled drivers - has been put on show.It was modified for handicapped drivers by an engineer from Alsace, Hans Kempf, who has been disabled since the age of three.

  • Description

    1.
    GV Car driven through streets of Molsheim
    0.08

    2.
    SV & CU car with name on front La Voiture Obeissante (the obedient car)
    0.15

    3.
    SV Martine Kempf, daughter of designer, driving car
    0.21

    4.
    SV INT Dashboard without steering wheel
    0.25

    5.
    SV Martine Kempf in car
    0.28

    6.
    GV Car on road
    0.32

    7.
    SV INT Foot controls
    0.35

    8.
    SV Car on street (2 shots)
    0.42

    9.
    SV & GV Car in street (3 shots)
    1.02

    10.
    SV Driver operates windscreen wipers with voice command
    1.08

    11.
    SV INT Foot controls
    1.12

    12.
    SV Car passing through streets (2 shots)
    1.22

    13.
    GV Car in street (2 shots)
    1.36

    14.
    GV Car enters driveway (2 shots)
    1.54

    15.
    SV Martine Kempf gets out of car, opens boot to reveal computer
    2.08

    16.
    SV ZOOM IN TO CU computer in rear of car
    2.20

    17.
    SV Martine Kempf operating computer with voice commands, door opens to command
    2.39




    Initials PM





    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: INTRODUCTION: A car partly controlled by word of mouth - especially adapted for disabled drivers - has been put on show.It was modified for handicapped drivers by an engineer from Alsace, Hans Kempf, who has been disabled since the age of three.

    SYNOPSIS: From outside it resembles an ordinary car.And standard models are used as the basis for the machine.But it has one big difference.It responds to voice commands from the driver -- hence the name, "The Obedient Car".

    Martine Kempf, daughter of the designer, puts the car through its pace.She operates it by speaking into a microphone, and a computer in the rear of the car transform her words into directives to the car.

    Foot controls are also used.The left foot controls the steering.The right foot controls the acceleration and brakes.Everything else is done by word of mouth.The car is designed for people without arms.

    Windscreen wipers respond to commands, as do all the electrical equipment, the handbrake, seat belts, the heaters, and even the car doors.All the driver has to do is give the order....and the car responds.

    This system is not new.Hans Kempf first thought of the idea when he was a student 25 years ago.He wrote a paper explaining how an armless driver could control a vehicle, and the idea caught on.Since then he says he has transformed 35,000 vehicles for people without arms.Here in the small French town of Molsheim, near Strasbourg, the car is a familiar sight.

    And here is the device that controls it all -- a compact computer that fits neatly into the back of the car.The machine was provided by the West German computer giant Siemens from its factory in Koustauz, and programmed to respond to 350 words -- in German.The car has been put on show at the Frankfurt Automobile Show.

    The designer hopes the car will bring new hope to disabled drivers throughout the world, allowing them to share the benefits of monitoring just like more fortunate drivers.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA10DPKZXTPERQAZWL8P8YF6TO2
    Media URN:
    VLVA10DPKZXTPERQAZWL8P8YF6TO2
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    17/09/1981
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:39:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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