• Short Summary

    ATLANTIC CITY, N.J., Sept. 18 -- Nearing completion of an FAA evaluation for certification, a?

  • Description

    1.
    CU Badge 'Hurricane Hunters U.S.A.' on man's shoulder
    3 ft

    2.
    MV Briefing session for pilots going out to seed storm centre
    27 ft

    3.
    MV Aircraft taking off - Naval - Dept. of Commerce - United States Weather Bureau
    48 ft

    4.
    CU Interior of aircraft and pilot receiving instructions
    83 ft

    5.
    GV Aircraft going through clouds
    99 ft

    1.
    Sign, Truck, C-141 Approaches
    4 1/2 ft

    2.
    StarLifter Approached
    2 1/2 ft

    3.
    Inside Flight Station; pilot's View Blocked
    2 1/2 ft

    4.
    Altimeter..Readings 100 Feet, etc.
    3 1/2 ft

    5.
    Ali Weather Landing
    12 ft


    Mr. Cannon WE THINK IT IS DOING EXTREMELY WELL. THE BIG STARLIFTER HAS MADE MORE THAN 300 FULLY AUTOMATIC LANDINGS WITH THIS SYSTEM. BY FULLY AUTOMATIC, I MEAN THE AWLS SYSTEM HAS BROUGHT THE 145-FOOT-LONG STARLIFTER ALL THE WAY TO THE GROUND, WITHOUT HELP FROM THE PILOT. AND THE AUTOMATIC LANDINGS HAVE BEEN PINPOINTED ON THE RUNWAY. THE PLANE HAS LANDED AUTOMATICALLY WITHIN 12 FEET OF EITHER SIDE OF THE RUNWAY'S CENTER LINE. AND, IT HAS LANDED AUTOMATICALLY WITHIN 300 FEET OF EITHER SIDE OF A DETERMINED TOUCHDOWN POINT.



    Question HOW DOES THAT COMPARE WITH OTHER LANDING SYSTEMS?



    Mr. Cannon WELL, MOST COMMERCIAL AIRLINERS OPERATE UNDER FAA CATEGORY I, WHICH MEANS IN WEATHER WITH A 200-FOOT CEILING AND 2400-FOOT VISIBILITY. SOME HAVE BEEN CERTIFICATED FOR CATEGORY II, WHICH IS 100-FOOT CEILING AND 1200-FOOT VISIBILITY. WE EXPECT TO OBTAIN A CATEGORY II CERTIFICATE BY THE END OF SEPTEMBER, BUT OUR TICKET WILL GO BEYOND THAT...



    Question WHAT DO YOU MEAN?



    Mr. Cannon FAA PILOTS FROM THE ATLANTA OFFICE ARE IN THE PILOTS SEAT, WITH HANDS OFF THE CONTROLS, AS THE C-141 COMES ALL THE WAY TO THE GROUND ON THE AUTOMATIC SYSTEM. THE C-141 SYSTEM WILL BE THE FIRST TO BE APPROVED BY THE FAA TO CONTROL AN AIRCRAFT ALL THE WAY TO THE RUNWAY.



    Question THAT IS ZERO-ZERO LANDING, ISN'T IT?



    Mr. Cannon WELL, IN A SENSE IT IS. IT IS FULLY AUTOMATIC LANDING. HOWEVER, 100-FOOT CEILING AND 1200-FOOT VISIBILITY ARE REQUIRED SO THE PILOT CAN BE ON STANDBY TO RESUME MANUAL OPERATION IF NECESSARY. AS SOON AS WE GET THE CATEGORY II TICKET, LOCKHEED WILL CONTINUE WORKING WITH THE FEDERAL AVIATION AGENCY TOWARD SETTING CRITERIA FOR THE ULTIMATE IN BAD WEATHER OPERATIONS -- LANDINGS IN WHICH THE CEILING AND VISIBILITY BOTH ARE ZERO. MEANWHILE, IN OCTOBER WE WILL BEGIN DELIVERING STARLIFTERS WITH PRODUCTION ALL WEATHER LANDING SYSTEMS TO THE AIR FORCE.



    Conclusion THANK YOU...THIS HAS BEEN A REPORT FROM CHARLES CANNON OF LOCKHEED-GEORGIA COMPANY ON A NEW ALL WEATHER LANDING SYSTEM DEVELOPED BY THE FEDERAL AVIATION AGENCY, THE AIR FORCE, AND LOCKHEED. AND THIS IS M. L. ST. JOHN OF LOCKHEED'S PUBLIC RELATIONS DEPARTMENT.



    ANNOUNCER: AT THE NATIONAL AVIATION FACILITIES EXPERIMENTAL CENTER, ATLANTIC CITY, NEW JERSEY,



    FAA AND AIR FORCE PILOTS ARE TESTING PERFORMANCE OF A NEW ALL WEATHER LANDING SYSTEM ON THE LOCKHEED C-141 STARLIFTER. THE SYSTEM CARRIES THE BIG PLANE, AUTOMATICALLY, ALL THE WAY TO THE GROUND.



    A CLOTH BLOCKS THE PILOT'S VIEW...SIMULATING BLIND LANDINGS. IN OTHER AUTOMATIC SYSTEMS, THE PILOT RESUMES CONTROL OF THE PLANE AT 100 FOOT ALTITUDE......BUT NOT WITH THIS ONE...



    THE NEW C-141 ALL WEATHER LANDING SYSTEM RETAINS CONTROL ALL THE WAY TO THE RUNWAY...LANDING THE AIRCRAFT FULLY AUTOMATICALLY, WHILE THE PILOT IS ONE STANDBY FOR OBSERVATION AND MANUAL OPERATION, IF NECESSARY. MORE THAN 300 FULLY AUTOMATIC LANDINGS HAVE BEEN COMPLETED.



    THE 145-FOOT LONG TRANSPORT HAS LANDED, AUTOMATICALLY, WITHIN 12 FEET OF EITHER SIDE OF THE RUNWAY CENTER LINE, AND WITHIN 300 FEET OF EITHER SIDE OF A DETERMINED TOUCHDOWN POINT. BY THE END OF SEPTEMBER, WHEN IT IS EXPECTED TO BE CERTIFICATED, THE C-141 ALL WEATHER LANDING SYSTEM WILL BE THE FIRST APPROVED BY THE FAA TO CONTROL AN AIRCRAFT ALL THE WAY TO THE GROUND. IN OCTOBER, STARLIFTERS EQUIPPED WITH THE PRODUCTION ALL WEATHER LANDING SYSTEM WILL BE DELIVERED TO THE AIR FORCE.




    Initials


    THIS SHOTLIST INTENDED AS A GUIDE ONLY

    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: ATLANTIC CITY, N.J., Sept. 18 -- Nearing completion of an FAA evaluation for certification, a production All Weather Landing System for the Air Force C-141 Star Lifter has carried the big transport all the way to touchdown more than 300 times at the National Aviation Facilities Experimental Center here.

    In these fully automatic landings, the 145-foot long fanjet aircraft has touched the runway within 12 feet of either side of the center line, and within approximately 300 feet of either side of a determined touchdown point.

    This progress report was made today by C.H. Cannon, of the Lockheed-Georgia Company, Marietta, Ga., program manager for the C-141 All Weather Landing System. Under contract administered by the Aeronautical Systems Division. Air Force Systems Command, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio, the All Weather Landing System was developed jointly by the Air Force, FAA, and Lockheed for installation on the Military Airlift Command's entire C-141 fleet.

    By the end of September, when the C-141 AWLS is expected to be certificated, it will be the first approved by the FAA to control an aircraft all the way to the ground, Mr. Cannon said. Automatic coupled approaches with this system will allow FAA certification to land in weather with a 100 foot ceiling and 1,200 foot runway visual range. In addition, the system has automatic flare capability, and landings complete to touchdown are being conducted automatically.

    Thus, where other All Weather Landing Systems return control of the plane to the pilot at 100 foot altitude, the C-141 AWLS retains control all the way to the ground, with the pilot on standby for visual observation and manual operation if necessary.

    James Robinson, pilot from the Atlanta Southern Region FAA Office, is conducting the inflight evaluation of one test C-141. Frank McGowan and Gene Raymond, of the FAA's Atlanta office, flying a second test StarLifter.

    Major S. A. Babin, of the Aeronautical Systems Division, is conducting evaluations on the system for the Air Force.

    Performance tests on the production All Weather Landing System have been in progress at NAFEC since July 23, 1967, carried on jointly by the FAA and Air Force. Lockheed Engineering Flight Test crews are assisting.

    In October, C-141s will be delivered to the Military Airlift Command with the All Weather Landing System installed. All C-141s now in service will be retrofitted with production AWLS.

    "The C-141 system is one of the most fully integrated and advanced systems in production today," Mr. Cannon asserted. "Prior to development of the system, more than two years of design studies were documented to determine the optimum system for the C-141. Requirements and specifications were established jointly among the Air Force, FAA, and Lockheed during this period."
    Instead of a "building block" approach using previously developed equipment, the C-141 specifications called for a completely integrated system, with all equipment especially designed to meet the stringent requirements of this advanced system, Mr. Cannon pointed out.

    In addition to the automatic pilot and flare computer for the automatic landing of the airplane, other new equipment consisted of the development of a new flight director system, radar altimeter, automatic throttle system, rotation and go-around system, and new pilot displays.

    An advanced feature is a new test and logic computer which was developed to allow automatic testing of the system in flight prior to let-down, and to provides monitoring of the various sub-systems for detection of failures and for automatic indication to the pilot and fail-safe disengagement of any faulty component.

    Major subcontractors selected to build the equipment to Lockheed specifications are Lear Siegler, Inc., Grand Rapids, Mich., flight director; Bendix Guidance and Control Division, Teterboro, N.J., automatic pilot and flare computer; United Controls, Redmond, Wash., automatic throttle, rotation and go-around system, and the test programmer and logic computer; and Minneapolis Honeywell, Minneapolis, Minn., radar altimeter.

    Introduction PERFORMANCE TESTING OF A NEW FAA-AIR FORCE-LOCKHEED ALL WEATHER LANDING SYSTEM IS NEAR COMPLETION AT THE FAA's TEST FACILITY IN ATLANTIC CITY, NEW JERSEY. CHARLES CANNON OF LOCKHEED-GEORGIA COMPANY IS PROGRAM MANAGER FOR THE SYSTEM, WHICH IS INSTALLED ON A C-141 STARLIFTER AIRCRAFT. MR. CANNON, HOW IS THE SYSTEM WORKING?

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA1HIM8WL0DYD6CH7X8R03PGW1O
    Media URN:
    VLVA1HIM8WL0DYD6CH7X8R03PGW1O
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    01/09/1967
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:00:40:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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