• Short Summary

    Mozambique's President Samora Machel is said to have doubts about joining international sanctions against South Africa.

  • Description

    1.
    GV PAN Along Zambezi River to dam lake, and dam site
    0.13

    2.
    LV PAN Cabora Bassa Dam with water pouring out of spillway and passing down ravine into Zambezi River
    0.29

    3.
    CU Water pouring out of spillway (2 shots)
    0.34

    4.
    LV PAN Along wall of dam
    0.47

    5.
    GV PAN UP FROM Dam wall TO Over head power pylons
    0.54

    6.
    CU Power pylons (2 shots)
    0.58

    7.
    LV PAN AND CU Power Station with power lines leading over hill to South Africa (4 shots)
    1.25

    8.
    LV PAN UP FROM Dam wall PAN ALONG Power lines and pylons on hillside (2 shots) (lines continue over hill)
    1.50

    9.
    LV PAN DOWN FROM Tree to the lake
    2.01

    10.
    SV AND TOP VIEW PAN Water pouring out of gate and flowing down Zambezi River (2 shots)
    2.24




    Initials SW/





    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: Mozambique's President Samora Machel is said to have doubts about joining international sanctions against South Africa. He says not only does Mozambique depend on the sale of electricity from the Cabora Bassa Dam to South Africa, but he also fears a repeat of what happened when the country joined the Rhodesian sanctions.

    SYNOPSIS: This is the Cabora Bassa Dam linked to a hydro-electric scheme, which when finished, will make it the largest in Africa with over 18,000 million kwh per year (Aswan in Egypt produces 10,000 million). Plans for a further power station of almost the same size are now being studied by Mozambique and West Germany.

    At the time of the Rhodesian sanctions, the international community promised, through the United Nations, to repay Mozambique the cost of its actions. Mr. Prakash Ratilal, Vice-Governor of the Bank of Mozambique has said that of the GBP 256 million that the UN estimates the sanctions cost Mozambique, only one third has actually been paid.

    Ninety-two per cent of the present capacity of Cabora Bassa is sold to South Africa, Mozambique's biggest trading partner. It is this economic dependence that accounts for the Mozambiquian dilemma. While economically dependent, they are politically totally at odds. Mozambique hates the South African apartheid, and South Africa loathes communism. Mozambique has had strong ties with Russia since independence five years ago when the Portuguese pulled out, taking not only their skills but vehicles and spare parts. Farms and factories were abandoned or sabotaged. There is still virtually no public transport. President Machel has now launched a programme to eliminate some of the worst economic ills.

    President Machel spent two months touring state-run businesses, factories and ports, and afterwards criticised them for "inefficiency, stupidity, rudeness and petty corruption". Mozambique's economic target for 1980 is to return industrial and agricultural output to pre-independence levels. While Mozambique has how become receptive to investment by the Western countries, President Machel has clearly stated that the country will remain faithful to its socialist ideals. With the emergence of an independent and friendly Zimbabwe Mozambique now stands a good chance of achieving its economic aims.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA1HPFFPX9KZ6H1N7N8JSQJ1WW6
    Media URN:
    VLVA1HPFFPX9KZ6H1N7N8JSQJ1WW6
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    01/07/1980
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:25:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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