• Short Summary

    Peru's first elected President for more than a decade, Fernando Belaunde Terry, has begun the task of forming a government.

  • Description

    1.
    GV PAN: Queues of voters at polling station (2 shots)
    0.29

    2.
    SV TILT DOWN FROM: Electoral lists TO man studying lists
    0.35

    3.
    CU: Tattered election posters on wall PULL BACK TO crowds of voters
    0.54

    4.
    SV: Armande Villanueva, candidate of APRA, and wife walking to polling boot surrounded by supporters.
    1.07

    5.
    CU: Villanueva speaking to reporter as he queues to vote
    1.34

    6.
    SV PAN: Night Scene of jubilant supporters carrying newspaper with headline proclaiming victory of Senor Belaunde. (2 shots)
    2.10




    Initials RH/





    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: Peru's first elected President for more than a decade, Fernando Belaunde Terry, has begun the task of forming a government. Senor Belaunde won a surprisingly decisive victory in Sunday's (18 May) election. He told reporters hat the military leadership, who called the election after running the country for twelve years, would respect the results of the poll and return to their barracks.

    SYNOPSIS: Peru's six and a half million voters were faced with a complicated task. There were fifteen candidates for President and a multitude seeking seats in the new lower and upper houses. Experts had predicted a close and indecisive result. But more than 43 per cent of the electorate voted for the man who had won the last free election in Peru in 1962 and who was removed from power by a bloodless coup five years later. Senor Belaunde also seems likely to gain to working majority in the new Parliaments, but the final result will not be known for at least two weeks.

    Armando Villanueva, the candidate of the leftist American Popular Revolutionary Party (APRA), was the biggest loser. His party, traditionally one of the best-organised in South America, was expected to match Belaunde's middle-of-the-road Popular Action Party. Instead, racked by internal dissension, they managed only 26 per cent of the vote. Senor Villanueva accused government officials of widespread fraud and warned that if it were not put right" blood could run in the streets". He asked his supporters to stay calm but after a campaign marred by violence, emotions are running high.

    As jubilant Popular Action Party supporters took to the streets of Lima to celebrate their victory, President-elect Belaunde said that leading members of the defeated parties would be included in his cabinet to promote national reconciliation. He will need their support as well as that of the military leadership who have voluntarily relinquished power before he can tackle Peru's serious economic problems. The new government faces an inflation rate of nearly sixty per cent and has promised to provide a million new jobs.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA2HEQNKH58LVZS86894O831GUP
    Media URN:
    VLVA2HEQNKH58LVZS86894O831GUP
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    20/05/1980
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:11:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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