• Short Summary

    In Peking, the city's two most beautiful parks have been re-opened to the public after being closed for nine years.

  • Description

    1.
    GV: Peking street scene
    0.10

    2.
    SV: People buying tickets to newly opened park.
    0.18

    3.
    CU: People looking at map of Bei Hai Park.
    0.23

    4.
    GV & CU: People entering Be Hai Park.
    0.42

    5.
    GV: Dagoba (buddhist structure) in Park.
    0.50

    6.
    GV & CU: People crossing bridge over the lake (3 SHOTS)
    1.20

    7.
    GV: Buddhist pagoda on hill of Coal Hill Park people coming had going from it.
    1.33

    8.
    GV OF : Forbidden City from Coal hill.
    1.40



    Initials JS/2300


    TELERECORDING

    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: In Peking, the city's two most beautiful parks have been re-opened to the public after being closed for nine years.

    SYNOPSIS: Word spread quickly through Peking that the two parks had been re-opened, and by mid-morning on Wednesday (1 March), an estimated 50,000 people had flocked to have a look. Officials say the parks had been closed for renovations.

    Despite this explanation, many people believe the parks were closed for security reasons, because they are close to the area where China's leaders live. Bei Hai Park - the name means North Sea - and the adjoining Coal Hill Park, overlook Peking's Forbidden City. Bei Hai Park's delightful landscape is dominated by a huge white Dagoba, a Buddhist structure built in 1651 on the site where the emperor Kublai Khan once had his palace.

    Chinese officials said they received orders from the Communist Party Chairman Hua Kuo-feng about two weeks ago to re-open the parks. They described these orders as "proof of the excellent situation in the country, with the downfall of the gang of four".

    They said the re-opening also marked the National People's Congress in Peking. After the delegates have dispersed throughout the country, the parks will continue to stay open daily.

    Coal Hill is also known as Prospect Hill because of its view over the Forbidden City. It consists of five hills built with earth taken from the city most, and contains a tree from which the last Ming emperor hanged himself at the time of the Manchu invasion.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA2JF2CKWJETUUKBKZ1WJQ42RC5
    Media URN:
    VLVA2JF2CKWJETUUKBKZ1WJQ42RC5
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    05/03/1978
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:41:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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