• Short Summary

    INTRODUCTION: Pakistan has assured India that this planned two billion dollar arms purchases agreement with the United States doesn't provide for an American military presence in the subcontinent.

  • Description

    1.
    GV Islamabad International Airport terminal.
    0.03

    2.
    SV Pakistani Foreign Minister Mr. Agha Shahi waiting at airport with other officials.
    0.06

    3.
    SV Indian foreign Minister Mr. P.V. Narasimha Rao leaving aircraft and being welcomed. Mr. Shahi greeting other Indian delegates.
    0.29

    4.
    GV Foreign Office.
    0.32

    5.
    SV INT Two ministers seated talking. (2 SHOTS)
    1.00

    6.
    SV Indian and Pakistani flags on table.
    1.01

    7.
    SV Delegates entering room and taking seats for talks.
    1.20

    8.
    SV Mr. Shahi seated facing visiting delegation.
    1.23

    9.
    SV Delegates talking.
    1.47




    Initials JS





    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: INTRODUCTION: Pakistan has assured India that this planned two billion dollar arms purchases agreement with the United States doesn't provide for an American military presence in the subcontinent. Pakistan's Foreign Minister Agha Shahi gave the assurance to his Indian counterpart, Mr. P.V. Narasimha Rao, during talks on Monday (8 June) covering the strategic situation in the region and Afghanistan.

    SYNOPSIS: Mr. Shahi was at Islamabad airport on Monday to welcome India's Foreign Minster on a five-day official visit. In their talks both ministers expressed reservations about Washington's plan to establish a rapid development force to protest the Gulf and the West's oil supplies. They insisted that the security of the Gulf was the concern of the countries of the region only.

    India fears that U.S. plans for the Gulf and its military support for Pakistan will intensify great power rivalry in south and central Asia, threatening Indian security and that of its neighbours. Afghanistan is another issue on which Pakistan and India disagree. The Pakistani Foreign Minister made it clear to Mr. Rao that his government wouldn't allow the country to be a channel for weapons for insurgents fighting the Soviet army and Kabul's Moscow-backed government.

    Pakistan demands an immediate and unconditional withdrawal of Soviet troops from Afghanistan. It sees the Soviet presence there as a serious threat to its security. India has never condemned the Soviet intervention and has accepted Moscow's explanation that the Soviet Union was forced to move because of an increase in foreign interference.

    Mr. Shahi and Mr. Rao were reported to show a common determination to understand each other's position. The Indian Foreign Minister's visit -- his first to Pakistan -- was seen by both sides as an attempt to put the new life into the agreement signed in Simla three years ago -- a document which normalised relations between India and Pakistan after three wars.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA2ORBH7XX6H2D8601GX7S019LR
    Media URN:
    VLVA2ORBH7XX6H2D8601GX7S019LR
    Group:
    Reuters - Including Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    10/06/1981
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:48:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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