• Short Summary

    INTRODUCTION: The floods and droughts of the past four years in Tanzania have left the country facing a serious food shortage.

  • Description

    1.
    GV PAN Bujimgwa village in the Misungwi district, Mwanza region showing rough tracks from village
    0.10

    2.
    GV Man drives cattle to grazing area
    0.22

    3.
    GV Cattle grazing (2 shots)
    0.30

    4.
    GV Track leading to grazing land suffering from severe erosion
    0.37

    5.
    GV Landrover driving on track through grassland
    0.48

    6.
    GV Villagers outside hut in Kanyerere village, also in Misungwi district
    0.56

    7.
    SV Women and children in village
    1.07

    8.
    GVs Children, teachers, leaving classrooms built by IFAD (2 shots)
    1.20

    9.
    GV Villagers taking water from IFAD-built well in Ihayabuyaga, also, in Mwanza, carrying water away (2 shots)
    1.36

    10.
    GV Dispensary in village in Mwamagigisi district, built by IFAD
    1.39

    11.
    CU Sign on dispensary wall
    1.42

    12.
    SV Man and boy being examined by medical staff, people leaving dispensary
    1.58

    13.
    GV Rocky mountains in Mwamagigisi district (3 shots)
    2.10

    14.
    GV IFAD-aided school house
    2.13

    15.
    SV Teacher and children grinding maize, women outside with baby (2 shots)
    2.27

    16.
    Classrooms built with traditional construction material (2 shots)
    2.35

    17.
    GV Classroom built with burnt bricks
    2.38




    Initials BB





    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: INTRODUCTION: The floods and droughts of the past four years in Tanzania have left the country facing a serious food shortage. According to President Julius Nyerere the resulting famine could cause thousands of deaths and is the biggest threat to Tanzania since independence. His message to farmers is: "modernise your farming methods and bring about self-sufficiency". One organisation the farmers can turn to for help is IFAD, the International Fund for Agricultural Development, a specialised agency of the United Nations.

    SYNOPSIS: More than 90 percent of Tanzania's 17 and a half million people are peasants, who live off the land. At the early stages of independence, the government launched the 'Ujamaa Villages Programme' under which scattered manpower is being brought together in communal villages, in an attempt to speed up social and economic development.

    President Nyerere is unhappy that Tanzania had to spend over 83 million dollars last year on food imports, in addition to foreign aid and loans. According to the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organisation, Tanzania has a massive shortfall in cereal crops, but this year cannot afford to buy from South Africa, the only country in Africa with large quantities of food available.

    In the village of Kanyerere in the Misungwi District, there are 344 people living. They are very happy with the aid programme sponsored by IFAD and say it is helping them harvest better crops and improve their standard of living.

    These two classrooms at Ngula in the Kwimba District were built with IFAD aid. They have enabled the school to accommodate an extra hundred children, who attended lessons in two shifts.

    It is through IFAD-aided projects that many villages are able to draw water from shallow wells.

    The Mwamagigisi dispensary and clinic serves around 3,000 people. The clinic was built by the villagers on a self-help basis, with IFAD providing 30 percent of the construction material. It is another example of this United Nations agency helping people to help themselves.

    Along the three bad harvests, Tanzania's economic problems have been compounded by the rising cost of fuel imports and the war against the former Ugandan dictator Idi Amin.

    IFAD has helped in building this school house accommodation, which provides the teachers with a normal family life. Their children learn to grind maize, which is the stable food of Sukumaland. The maize corn is roasted.

    The traditional construction material in the Mwanza region is red soil. IFAD has provided aid here for the construction of two additional classrooms of burnt brick.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA3EHE4IMCMWCJL8FGFQY4UHQP1
    Media URN:
    VLVA3EHE4IMCMWCJL8FGFQY4UHQP1
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    18/06/1981
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:38:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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