• Short Summary

    In hurricane-ravaged Honduras, in Central America, the immediate crisis is easing. Roads are being reopened,?

  • Description

    1.
    Aerial views flooded landscape
    0.11

    2.
    Aircraft landing on makeshift runway (road)
    0.21

    3.
    GV Supplies being loaded into aircraft
    0.34

    4.
    GV Aircraft takes off
    0.42

    5.
    GV San Pedro Sula airport
    0.45

    6.
    GV Supplies convoy along road and into village (3 shots)
    1.04

    7.
    GV Ambulance along road
    1.05

    8.
    CU Medical staff innoculating villagers (3 shots)
    1.23

    9.
    CU Children suffering from malnutrition in hospital (2 shots)
    1.34

    10.
    GV Ford being distributed (3 shots)
    1.47

    11.
    GV PAN flooded area
    1.57

    12.
    GV Villagers looking through ravaged corn fields (3 shots)
    2.11

    13.
    GV Destroyed banana plantation
    2.21

    14.
    SV Small boy carrying bunch of bananas
    2.27



    Initials ET/1806 ET/1837



    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: In hurricane-ravaged Honduras, in Central America, the immediate crisis is easing. Roads are being reopened, some trains are running and food and medical supplies are beginning to reach the worst-hit areas of the remote north.

    Estimates of the death toll from Hurricane Fifi vary, and a definate figure may never be fixed. The Honduran Emergency Committee still fears 10,000 people were killed, but United States officials have been unable to confirm more than 1000 deaths.

    Apart from the human tragedy, the country must also look to the long-term economic damage caused by the hurricane. Figures here, too, are not precise, but obviously the Honduran economy has been dealth a heavy blow. Estimates of total economic losses begin at 500 million US dollars (about GBP 200 million sterling).

    Exports will be cut by half next year, mainly because the country's banana crop - the main export - has been almost obliterated. Coffee, beans, maize and rice - which make up the subsistence diets of the Honduran peasants - have been wiped out.

    SYNOPSIS: In the Central American State of Honduras, the agonising clean-up operation continues in the wake of the devastating Hurricane Fifi.

    British and United States military aircraft are being used to ferry food and medical supplies to the worst-hit areas in the north.

    Here in San Pedro Sula, a city street has been sealed off and is being used as an emergency airfield. Food supplies are collected in the town, where distribution is coordinated.

    The supplies are put aboard small aircraft, sent from all over Central America, and dropped over the disaster zones. There is a take-off and landing every five minutes, twelve hours a day.

    And as supply convoys fan out over the country, officialdom still disagrees over the hurricane death toll. The Honduran Emergency Committee claims ten thousand people were killed, but United States officials say they have not been able to conform more than a thousand deaths.

    The living, too, face new perils....especially disease. A massive innoculation programme has been started, with foreign assistance. Emergency hospitals have been rushed, as refugees flock into the areas being served by relief organisations.

    Here in Choloma, several orphaned and abandoned babies are being treated by volunteer medical staff. Two are mentally retarded because of malnutrition.

    Relief supplies of food are being distributed by Peace Corps volunteers....in an attempt to evert more deaths. However, the problem of food looms larger as reports of crop destruction reach the authorities Coffee, beans, maize and rice - the crops which feed the villagers - have largely been wiped out by the hurricane and subsequent floods.

    In El Progressa, a town in the Sula Valley, almost all the banana and maize crops were destroyed... and they were the sole means of support for the entire population. In other words, they've lost everything and probably will never completely recover.

    The impact on the Honduran economy will be severe ... estimates of long-term economic losses begin at five hundred million dollars. The biggest blow is to the banana crop - the main export - which was almost obliterated.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA3R9TSSPVSR9CZI6FFZGZ945G9
    Media URN:
    VLVA3R9TSSPVSR9CZI6FFZGZ945G9
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    28/09/1974
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Black & White
    Duration:
    00:01:09:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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