• Short Summary

    A leading population expert said in London on Monday (7 July) that the birth rate in developing countries was declining.

  • Description

    1.
    GV Wembley conference centre, London and conference sign: "World Fertility Survey conference" (2 shots)
    0.10

    2.
    SV PAN Delegates arrive and enter
    0.18

    3.
    CU INTERIOR Delegate with conference folder in his lap
    0.21

    4.
    GV Officials on top table
    0.24

    5.
    SVs Delegates from India, Hong Kong, and Africa (3 shots)
    0.34

    6.
    CU Professor Milos Macura speaking to Visnews reporter John Darby n English (SHOTS OF BABIES ARE OVERLAID DURING THE INTERVIEW)
    1.36


    DARBY: "Professor, in the nineteen fifties and sixties, as you are obviously aware, there were a number of dire predictions made about population catastrophe towards the end of the century. Do these predictions still hold good?"



    MACURA: "Well, maybe I don't like the term "catastrophe", but the projections which we have in the United Nations, indicate that the world population will be in the year two-thousand, six or six point two billion which is fifty per cent more than what we have today. So I think that it's still a very serous problem."



    DARBY: "Is it a catastrophe?"



    MACURA: "Well, catastrophe, yes, if we won't able to keep up wit the demand for food, employment, education and so on. However, if humanity would be able to manage these essential things, I wouldn't say it would be a catastrophe."





    Initials BB/





    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: A leading population expert said in London on Monday (7 July) that the birth rate in developing countries was declining. But he said that global growth would not stop until the world's population had nearly tripled from its present four billion. Dr. Leon Tabah, Director of the United Nations Population Division, made these predictions at the opening meeting of the World Fertility Survey Conference.

    SYNOPSIS: Some six hundred delegates from 93 countries heard Dr. Tabah's view that the population would become stationary late in the next century at about eleven billion. He said the drop in the third-world birth rate was due to a combination of factors: government policies, wider availability of modern contraception devices, and a desire for couples to have fewer children.

    Visnews reporter John Darby asked Professor Milos Macura, Project Director of the organisation, about problems the world's fast growing populating will have to face:

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA3S3NMVSDTYWH07VTL5BZ801UI
    Media URN:
    VLVA3S3NMVSDTYWH07VTL5BZ801UI
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    08/07/1980
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:37:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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