• Short Summary

    INTRODUCTION: Poland's new government has signed agreements with students and farmers threatening to prolong the country's industrial strife.

  • Description

    1.
    SV (MUTE/MONO) INTERIOR Students assembled in hall in Lodz (2 shots)
    0.16

    2.
    SV (MUTE/MONO) Minister for Higher Education Janusz Gorski signs agreement
    0.22

    3.
    LV (MUTE/MONO) Students leaders sign agreement
    0.29

    4.
    CU (MUTE/MONO) Minister Gorski applauds as students hold agreements aloft (2 shots)
    0.38

    5.
    TV Farmers leaders assembled in a hall in Rzeszow
    0.50

    6.
    CU PAN FROM Government official TO Solidarity leader Lech Walesa seated opposite speaking in Polish
    1.10

    7.
    TV and CU Government officials speaking in Polish (2 shots)
    1.23

    8.
    CU (MUTE) Walesa and farmers sign agreement
    1.31

    9.
    CU (MUTE) Government officials signing agreement
    1.49

    10.
    TV (MUTE) Union and government officials seated opposite a table surrounded by farmers
    1.52




    Initials PM



    EUROVISION TELERECORDING

    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: INTRODUCTION: Poland's new government has signed agreements with students and farmers threatening to prolong the country's industrial strife. The agreements came after students had occupied university premises in the city of Lodz; while farm workers continued their protest in the southern town of Rzeszow. Reports from Poland say the deals may have brought social peace to the country, and represent success for the new prime minister, General Wojciech Jaruzelski.

    SYNOPSIS: The Lodz negotiations had been long and hard and the final agreement involved concessions by both sides. The students gained influence over appointments and curricula; and won freedom to study a foreign language of their choice.

    But the Higher Education Minister, Mr. Janusz Gorski, who signed the agreement, won concessions too. The students agreed to an association, not a union, and also pledged to uphold the Polish constitution. And they also failed to secure an end to censorship, release of political prisoners, or an end to compulsory study of Marxism.

    The farmers' agreement followed hard negotiations between farmers' negotiators led by Solidarity leader Lech Walesa and Government officials in a hall in Rzeszow. The farmers won a greater investment and security for the private farming sector, and recognition of private farmers as a lasting part of the national economy. Equal pensions and equal distribution of land for all citizens was also ensured.

    But one of the major issues, recognition of the independent farmers' unions was sidestepped during talks. Earlier, farmers' leaders had been threatening to strike if their union was not registered. But after the talks at Rzeszow, they appeared to accept pledges from Solidarity to push for registration at a later date.

    Reports from the country say the farmers' action is regarded in some quarters as a climbdown -- and is likely to be represented as such at a Communist Party Congress in Moscow next week, where Poland's leaders are expected to be questioned closely on their experience with the independent unions.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA494HZUB5E27J39TL9IT2M1Y07
    Media URN:
    VLVA494HZUB5E27J39TL9IT2M1Y07
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    19/02/1981
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:53:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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