• Short Summary

    Some important anthropological discoveries were made recently in the Petralona Cave of Chalkidike in northern Greece.

  • Description

    1.
    LV PAN DOWN FROM Picture of Neanderthal man TO cabinet with bones on display
    0.09

    2.
    CU Skull found in cave (2 shots)
    0.20

    3.
    CU & SV PAN Skull turned by Professor Ioannis Melendis of the Institute of Anthropology and Geology of Salonika, and compared with photograph (2 shots)
    0.44

    4.
    CU Portrait of Neanderthal man and Professor Melandis holding lower jaw bone of 12 year old boy's skull (2 shots)
    0.55

    5.
    SV & CU Large bones on display with examples of teeth of giraffes and elephants (4 shots)
    1.16

    6.
    LV PAN DOWN Bones of giraffe and elephant on display
    1.22




    Initials BB/





    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: Some important anthropological discoveries were made recently in the Petralona Cave of Chalkidike in northern Greece. One of the most exciting finds ever in Europe is the skull of a twelve-year-old boy belonging to the Homo Erectus period. In the same area, bones of prehistoric animals now native only to Africa, were found that pre-date the human skull.

    SYNOPSIS: The discoveries from the Petralona Caves were brought to the Institute of Anthropology and Geology in Salonika in northern Greece.

    The boy's skull is thought to date back two hundred and sixty five thousand years, putting it in the "Homo Erectus" period when man's evolutionary forbear is believed to have begun walking upright. Professor Ioannis Melendis of the Salonika Institute compared the newly found skull with a photograph of a Neanderthal man, believed to have lived in European and Mediterranean regions perhaps two hundred thousand years later. It is the first time bones of such an early period, in the evolution of man, have been found on the European continent.

    While Professor Melendis and other European anthropologists agree on the age of the skull, they believe animals remains found in the same area could be as much as ten million years old.

    The animal bones are those of a Macedonian Pithecus, an elephant and a giraffe, meaning that animals, once thought to have lived only in Africa, must have roamed over Europe, as well, and certainly in the Balkans area. Perhaps climatic changes, or the appearance of man himself are responsible for the disappearance of these animals from what is now the continent of Europe.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA4GOUU9ZZTGLNYQU9TGXTZXP2O
    Media URN:
    VLVA4GOUU9ZZTGLNYQU9TGXTZXP2O
    Group:
    Reuters - Including Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    20/01/1980
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:23:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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