• Short Summary

    INTRODUCTION: South Africa's National Party (NP), the white minority rulers since 1948, was swept into power for a further five years in a white only general election on Thursday (30 April).

  • Description

    1.
    SV Helen Suzman, Progressive Federal Party (PFP) M. P. speaking to reporter
    0.13

    2.
    SCU Reporter Ian Smith asking question
    0.21

    3.
    SCU Mrs. Suzman speaking
    0.37

    4.
    SCU Bishop Desmond Tutu speaking
    0.51

    5.
    SCU Dr. Ntatho Motlana speaking
    1.30

    6.
    SCU Prime Minister P.W. Botha celebrating with young supporters
    1.34

    7.
    SCU/SV Children singing in front of Prime Minister (3 shots)
    1.52

    8.
    SV Mr. Botha with party members at celebrations (4 shots)
    2.16

    9.
    SCU Mr. Botha speaking
    2.40


    SPEECH ON FILM (TRANSCRIPT)



    SEQ. 1 SUZMAN: "What it does mean, I think, is that a lot of South Africans have come to realise that reform is absolutely essential, if we are to avoid really violent confrontation in this country, with the black citizens in South Africa."



    SMITH: "Do you think though that the government will take their cue from you the progressive or are they more interested in trying to counter the rise of the right-wing Herstigte Nasionale Party?"



    SUZMAN: "I think that P.W. Botha is very well aware of the dissension in his own party and priority number-one for him is the maintenance of Afrikaaners nationalist unity and exclusive Afrikaaners nationalist power. And therefore he's going to be very cautious."



    SMITH: "Bishop, what does this election mean to the Africans here?"



    TUTU: "It has total irrelevance for us. It's an exercise in futility. They are not dealing with the crunch issue in this country which is political power sharing with all the people of this country."



    MOTLANA: "In fact we're going to see a government scared of what's happening on its right wing, and from its left-wing."



    SMITH: "How do you see the future then?"



    MOTLANA: "Changes will come about in this country by extra-parliamentary means."



    SMITH: "What do you mean by that?"



    MOTLANA: "Pressure from blacks. Internal pressure, peaceful pressure in the form of demonstrations, industrial action, pressure hopefully from South African's friends in the West, because any fomentation endangers their investments, and thirdly, pressure, maybe, from insurgents coming in here with AK-47s."



    SMITH: "The Prime Minister was celebrating yet another landslide win for the National Party, even before the results were in. He knows campaign promises for continued apartheid attract votes. Recently Mr. Botha has hardly mentioned a better deal for the blacks and reform, because he knows that frightens the Afrikaaner. So he probably wasn't prepared for the night's results. Under P.W. Botha's leadership, the National Party lost votes to both the left and the right. He probably won't worry too much about the gains of the anti-apartheid party, the PFP, but he'll be sore about Afrikaaners defecting to the far-right parties. To check that swing, he'll probably hesitate over further reform."



    P.W. BOTHA: "It's a mandate to carry out my election manifesto, and nothing more .... and I won't be pressed by the international world, and I won't be kicked around in South Africa. I am going to proceed with my way and with the face I expressed in the election manifesto of the National Party."





    Initials BB



    REPORTER: BRITISH BROADCASTING CORPORATION'S IAN SMITH TELERECORDING

    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: INTRODUCTION: South Africa's National Party (NP), the white minority rulers since 1948, was swept into power for a further five years in a white only general election on Thursday (30 April). But there was a major erosion in its popular vote for both from the left and right. With ten results outstanding, the N.P. returned 124 seats in the 165-seat parliament, 13 less than last time. The official opposition -- the Progressive Federal Party (PFP) increased its strength by one-third to 24 seats. The extreme white Herstigte Nasionale Party (HNP) notched an impressive number of votes but has not yet gained a seat. BBC's Ian Smith asked Helen Suzman, PFP member of parliament, Bishop Desmond Tutu and Dr. Ntatho Motlana, chairman of the Soweto Committee of Ten, about their reaction to the election results.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA4UFV6XT6LVONH5HLRL1G8XI7P
    Media URN:
    VLVA4UFV6XT6LVONH5HLRL1G8XI7P
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    30/04/1981
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:40:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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