• Short Summary

    INTRODUCTION: U.S. Deputy Secretary of State William Clark has completed his African mission, aimed at winning support for independence in Namibia (South West Africa).

  • Description

    1.
    SV ZOOM OUT GV U.S. delegation walks across tarmac, at Salisbury
    0.08

    2.
    SV PAN William Clark talking to reporters
    0.29

    3.
    SV Clark gets into car
    0.35

    4.
    SV PAN Clark and delegation arrive for meeting
    0.45

    5.
    SV Prime Minister Robert Mugabe greets Clark and U.S. delegation (2 shots)
    1.09

    6.
    SV ZOOM TO CU Mugabe speaking with Clark
    1.22

    7.
    SV PAN Mugabe, Clark and delegation enter building
    1.31

    8.
    GV PAN Building
    1.36

    9.
    SV Clark leaves and speaks to newsmen (2 shots)
    1.44

    10.
    SV Mugabe leaves and speaks to newsmen
    2.00


    SPEECH ON FILM (TRANSCRIPT)



    MUGABE: (SEQ 10) "I will release a statement this afternoon."



    INTERVIEWER: "Do you think it has changed anything, sir?"



    MUGABE: "Well, I'll tell you this afternoon."





    Initials BB





    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: INTRODUCTION: U.S. Deputy Secretary of State William Clark has completed his African mission, aimed at winning support for independence in Namibia (South West Africa). On the final leg of the tour, the American envoy met Zimbabwe's Prime Minister Robert Mugabe, after holding talks in Namibia and South Africa. Zimbabwe is one of the black African front line states, and closely concerned with the Namibian crisis.

    SYNOPSIS: At Salisbury airport, Mr. Clark said his earlier talks with South African Foreign Minister Pik Botha had gone very well.

    The American delegation arrived in the wake of an editorial in the pro-government Herald newspaper, which described their mission as a useless exercise. Because the United States had promised there would be no premature news leaks, Mr. Clark refused to comment.

    President Reagan's administration is known to favour reducing the Untied Nations role in the transitional period before independence, but wants the presence of a U.N. civilian component in Namibia. Opposition to U.N. involvement has been expressed by several African leaders.

    Prime Minister Mugabe has already pledged military, political and moral support to guerrillas fighting for independence in Namibia. He has urged Zimbabweans to donate cash to the guerrillas, but has not revealed how much his government has contributed to the cause. The guerrillas have said the amount is 50,000 dollars.

    Mr. Clark and his delegation met Prime Minister Mugabe for 90 minutes of talks. The American team is said to have described the meeting as warm, cordial and frank. However, the Salisbury government is said to fear that the Reagan administration may soften its line towards South Africa.

    Mr. Mugabe wants western nations seeking an acceptable independence settlement to continue with the U.N. peace formula. Although Mr. Clark brushed past newsmen, Prime Minister Mugabe has promise a statement on the talks.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA56QEQRR6VKZT6GHRTY9YIX8OX
    Media URN:
    VLVA56QEQRR6VKZT6GHRTY9YIX8OX
    Group:
    Reuters - Including Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    15/06/1981
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:00:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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