• Short Summary

    The Year of the Tiger is dawning -- and according to one Hong Kong soothsayer, it's a year.

  • Description

    1.
    GV Wong Tai??? Tample ???
    0.03

    2.
    CU Carved stons h???ad
    0.06

    3.
    TV & CU People lighting & burning incense (4 shots)
    0.19

    4.
    SV & CU Woman Kneeling & shaking fortune-telling sticks (2 shots)
    0.24

    5.
    SV People lighting joss sticks at table with food and drinks
    0.27

    6.
    SV Man brings roasted piglet to temple
    0.35

    7.
    SV & ??? People placing food offerings on table (6 shots)
    0.53

    8.
    LV People enter & leave temple
    0.56

    9.
    LV & CU Man writing new religious poster for the New Year (4 shots)
    1.05

    10.
    GV & SV "Kut" plants being ???ol in garde??? (2)
    1.10

    11.
    SV & CU "Kut" plants growing in pots (??? shots)
    1.17



    Initials SC/1905 SC/1932



    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: The Year of the Tiger is dawning -- and according to one Hong Kong soothsayer, it's a year. to be extra cautious.

    Looking into the future is just one aspect of preparations for the Chinese New Year, which is celebrated over three days from 23 January.

    In Hong Kong, as in other centres of Chinese population, it's the custom for people to offer prayers for good health and good fortune in the year ahead. The Chinese are also very superstitious, and it's not uncommon to find people from all walks of life trying to read their fortunes in the days leading up to the New Year.

    On way is to shake a container filled with sticks that are marked with numbers, When a stick falls out, the receiver takes the number down to the local fortune-teller to interpret.

    The temples in Hong Kong have been crowded with worshippers offering food to the goods. Roast suckling pigs, chicken, fruits and other delicacies are offered during prayers, then taken home to be eaten.

    The Hong Kong flower trade has a boom before the New Year -- giving plants as gifts gives rise to a flower fair which lasts the last ten days of the old year. There's also a big trade in kuts -- small mandarin plants -- which are used to decorate the dome.

    One leading soothsayer in Hong Kong predicts that the Year of the Tiger will be bad for working people everywhere, and businesswise, it will be better to go about things slowly and steadily. His advise: "Don't rush, and don't be greedy." He also believes that it's a good year to get married, and notes that children born in the Year of the Tiger are intelligent, stubborn and harder to handle.

    In contrast to the festive and carefree nature of Hong Kong's celebrations, The People's Republic of China has waged a campaign against too much good living during the three-day Lunar New Year festival. Calling for a "revolutionised" festival, the People's Daily newspaper noted that "over-eating and drinking, extravagance and waste was the way of living of the landlord class and the bourgeoisis" and should be "resolutely opposed."
    SYNOPSIS: The religious aspect dominates the Chinese New Year -- this man is writing up new worship lessons to be displayed in private homes.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA57CHVTMFJHGDSEWBRP1I58R5H
    Media URN:
    VLVA57CHVTMFJHGDSEWBRP1I58R5H
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    21/01/1974
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Black & White
    Duration:
    00:01:18:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

Comments (0)

We always welcome comments and more information about our films.
All posts are reactively checked. Libellous and abusive comments are forbidden.

Add your comment