• Short Summary

    VARIOUS, CANADA

    INTRODUCTION: Canadian environmentalists and wildlife experts are angry about a decision to allow the capture of rare falcons for export to Saudi Arabia.

  • Description

    1. SCU Falcon standing on rock and pair of falcons with chicks in nest. (2 SHOTS) 0.11
    2. SCU Saudi diplomat, Ahmed Beyari speaking 0.19
    3. SCUs Falcons on nest and rocks. (3 SHOTS) 1.00
    4. CU Ken Brynaert speaking 1.17
    5. SV Brynaert speaking to reporter. 1.23
    6. SCU Falcons feeding and on cliff face. 1.35
    7. CU Stuffed falcon. 1.44
    SPEECH (TRANSCRIPT)
    SEQ. 2: BEYARI: "They give them names. When they call them by name, the falcons come. There is a special relationship between the falcon and the trainer, the man, his master."
    SPEECH (TRANSCRIPT)
    SEQ. 5: BRYNAERT: "There's not been sufficient government study done to determine how many (INDISTINCT) falcons there are in the area that they want to take these birds from, and indeed we're very apprehensive about the exploitation of any resource when we don't know what the inventories are."
    InitialsJS

    NOTE TO EDITORS: THIS STORY INCLUDES NARRATION BY CBC'S ROXANNA SPICER WHICH MAY BE USED IF PREFERRED
    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: VARIOUS, CANADA

    INTRODUCTION: Canadian environmentalists and wildlife experts are angry about a decision to allow the capture of rare falcons for export to Saudi Arabia. There's been an unexpected demand for the sporting falcons, despite an asking price which exceeds what most people can afford to spend on a house.

    SYNOPSIS: The craze for falconry started last year when Canada's Prime Minister Trudeau gave one of the birds as a gift to Saudi Arabia's King Khalid. Now, shiekhs, princes and sultans all want falcons.

    This particular breed of small falcon lives in Canada's far north, within the Arctic circle. It's a climate far removed from that of the Middle East, but wealthy Arabs will pay generously to get one of the birds. Just one falcon can change hands for 40,000 U.S. dollars. The temptation for exploiters has proved irresistible. This year, the territorial government was asked for permission to capture 400 birds. The administration agreed to the capture of far fewer -- just fifty. In Ottawa, however, the Canadian Wildlife Federation says even fifty birds is fifty too many.

    Wildlife official Ken Brynaert is part of a lobby group which has sent a protest letter to the Northwest Territories' administration. He admits there's nothing his group can do to stop the hunt for the falcons. But he also says the Federal Government will have the final word. It can refuse to sign the export permits -- a measure which would make the capture of the birds in the place a fruitless venture.

    Source: CANADIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA5DZEZDQMR5PO68T5BK4NY6L5H
    Media URN:
    VLVA5DZEZDQMR5PO68T5BK4NY6L5H
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    10/10/1981
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:45:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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