• Short Summary

    SHENANDOAH MOUNTAINS, VIRGINIA, USA

    Deep in Shenandoah Mountain country, near Front Royal, Virginia, biologists and conservationists from around the world gather each summer to learn techniques in the care and protection of endangered species.

  • Description

    1. CU Thistle PULL BACK TO Shenandoah mountain landscape 0.15
    2. GV Biologists tramping through field 0.23
    3. GV Pere Davidson deer, of China, in field PULL BACK TO biologists with binoculars and taking notes (6 shots) 0.54
    4. SVs, CUs AND GVs Conservationists using radio-telemetry to locate animals in wild (5 shots) 1.28
    5. SV Dr Rudolph Rudran, Director of The Smithsonian Wildlife Federation speaking (SOT) 1.44
    6. GVs AND SVs Conservationists being taught to use tranquilliser guns (6 shots) 2.12
    7. GV Conservationists tramping up hill at end of day 2.17
    TRANSCRIPT (SEQ 5):
    RUDRAN: "Through my experience in different countries, I have come to realise that training is one of the important things for conserving wildlife in developing countries."
    InitialsASG/SW


    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: SHENANDOAH MOUNTAINS, VIRGINIA, USA

    Deep in Shenandoah Mountain country, near Front Royal, Virginia, biologists and conservationists from around the world gather each summer to learn techniques in the care and protection of endangered species. The course is conducted by the National Zoo, part of the Smithsonian Institute, which runs a three-thousand-acre (1,250-hectare) farm for breeding wild animals. Scientists at the Smithsonian Institute believe that unless steps are taken soon, hundreds of species throughout the world will become extinct. This summer, thirteen biologists from seven countries undertook the Smithsonian training course. The programme ranged from the use of basic instruments, such as paper, pencil and compass, to the use of sophisticated radio-telemetry to locate animals in the wild. Telemetry permits scientists to study the animals' migration patterns and grazing habits. Another technique, invaluable for biologists studying species in the wild, is use of a tranquilliser gun to immobilise animals so they can be treated or tagged without coming to harm. The course lasts six weeks and afterward, the students are able to look at wildlife problems from a global viewpoint, realising that conservation is a worldwide concern seldom unique to their own countries. Those taking part in the summer of '84 course were from China, Peru, India, Sri Lanka, West Malaysia, Zambia and Nigeria. Dr. Rudolph Rudran of Sri Lanka, the Smithsonian's director of Wildlife Federation Studies, said that in his experience, field training was an essential part of conserving wildlife in developing countries.

    Source: UNITED STATES INFORMATION AGENCY (U.S.I.A)

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA5H335U0XT3U45ZP4DJF4XONBG
    Media URN:
    VLVA5H335U0XT3U45ZP4DJF4XONBG
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    23/07/1984
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:17:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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