• Short Summary

    In South Africa, conservationists from 30 countries have been attending a conference held to find ways to save the world's wilderness areas.

  • Description

    1.
    CU: Painting of a lion at congress in Johannesburg, S. Africa
    0.05

    2.
    CU: Painting of cheetah with cubs.
    0.11

    3.
    CU ZOOM OUT: Painting of tiger
    0.22

    4.
    CU ZOOM OUT: Painting of bull elephant.
    0.30

    5.
    CU: Sculpture of antelope.
    0.32

    6.
    CU: Painting of rare birds, and bird sculpture. (TWO SHOTS)
    0.45

    7.
    CU: Painting of wildcat attacking cobra.
    0.50

    8.
    SV INTERIOR: Delegates attending congress.
    0.54

    9.
    CU: Congress president Ian Player addressing congress and delegates applaud. (TWO SHOTS)
    2.03


    PLAYER: "There are large areas throughout the world, that in terms of optimum land use capabilities, must be maintained as wilderness; maintained for high quality water production, maintained for soil conservation purposes, and maintained for wild plants and wild animals for their food and tourism potential. We must do everything in our endeavour to keep these areas wild and natural for as long as possible. We must educate and enlighten all our people to a realisation that wilderness and natural resources must be conserved; that is, used wisely, if we are to survive as a human race."




    Initials JS/1905



    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: In South Africa, conservationists from 30 countries have been attending a conference held to find ways to save the world's wilderness areas. At the five-day conference in Johannesburg which ended on October 29th, South African writer and explorer Laurens van der Post warned that the world's "spiritual survival" depended on conservation.

    SYNOPSIS: A number of wildlife paintings were auctioned during the event to raise funds for the World Wilderness Congress. In all 60,000 rand (73,500 U.S. dollars) were collected at the Sotheby's sale. Most of the artists involved donated all the proceeds from the sale of their paintings to the Congress, which was organised in the "face of powerful international opposition', according to chairman Ian Player. Most of the opposition was expressed because of South Africa's racial policies.

    In fact the Congress delegates discussed not only wildlife but also endangered human species. There were speeches from a Mohawk Indian princess and one of the few full-blooded aboriginals left in Australia. Many black speakers blamed the coming of the white man for the decline of wild areas in Africa.

    Chairman Ian Player made the opening speech to the congress.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA5WSATB1FGWBXI3XV6G53RKA70
    Media URN:
    VLVA5WSATB1FGWBXI3XV6G53RKA70
    Group:
    Reuters - Including Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    31/10/1977
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:04:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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