• Short Summary

    WASHINGTON DC, USA/MOSCOW, USSR/LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM/SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA

    The Soviet Union's announcement on May 8 that it is withdrawing from the 1984 Olympic Games in Los Angeles has provoked world-wide controversy.

  • Description

    NBC, MAY 8, 1984
    1. SV Chairman of Los Angeles Olympic Committee Peter Ueberroth speaking in Washington 0.22
    VIS FILE
    2. GV Natalia Yurchenko competing on asymmetric bars in Moscow on August 2, 1983 (AS SPEECH CONTINUES) 0.30
    AUGUST 21, 1984
    3. GV High jumper Tamara Bykova equaling world record in London (AS SPEECH CONTINUES) 0.45
    4. SV Peter Ueberroth speaking 0.47
    NBC, MAY 9, 1984
    5. SV AND CU Soviet television reporter and TASS Newspaper cuttings in Moscow (3 shots) 1.24
    6. SCU Soviet commentator Joseph Adamov speaking in Moscow (SOT) 1.41
    VIS SYDNEY, MAY 9
    7. GV Soviet coach Valery Kiselev speaking in Russian in Sydney with English translator (SOT RUSSIAN AND ENGLISH) 2.09
    8. SCU President of the IOC Juan Antonio Samaranch speaking in Washington on May 8, 1984 (SOT) 2.29
    TRANSCRIPT (SEQ 1):
    UEBERROTH: "We are very disappointed that, of their decision, that learning of their decision today; we're very disappointed in that it appears we're paying the price for 1980. That's our interpretation; we're paying the price for 1980, and again, the ones that are hurt are the athletes. There's not a U.S athlete that I've met that does not want the chance to compete against the very best of the athletes in Moscow suffered because they could not compete against the very best, and we will use every ounce of energy to try and reverse this decision on behalf of the athletes of the world, so that the games can go on with the best possible competition."
    TRANSCRIPT (SEQ 6):
    ADAMOV: "My personal opinion is that this decision will hold. I cannot speak for the government or the national Olympic committee, but unless the United States does something drastically--that is, the administration--I don't see how this decision could be changed."
    TRANSCRIPT (SEQ 7):
    TRANSLATOR: "If the USA State Department provides, or probably says, or gives some guarantees for the security of our sportsmen, everything will be all right."
    TRANSCRIPT (SEQ 8):
    REPORTER: "Mr. Samaranch, what does this mean for the future of the Olympic movement?"
    SAMARANCH: "Well, that's a new problem, and we have always many problems, but well, we, as I said before, we will do our best to preserve the games in Los Angeles."
    InitialsASG/SW

    NOTE TO EDITORS: THIS STORY HAS COMMENTARY BY NBC REPORTER JOHN COCHRAN WHICH MAY BE USED IF REQUIRED
    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: WASHINGTON DC, USA/MOSCOW, USSR/LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM/SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA

    The Soviet Union's announcement on May 8 that it is withdrawing from the 1984 Olympic Games in Los Angeles has provoked world-wide controversy. Speaking in Washington the same day, Los Angeles Olympic Committee Chairman Peter Ueberroth stated that the United States' boycott of the 1980 Moscow Olympics was a major factor in the Kremlin's decision to withhold its athletes' participation. Nevertheless, US Olympic officials remained cautiously hopeful that the Soviet Union would reverse its decision and send a complete team to the Los Angeles games. Citing security dangers to its competitors, Moscow appeared to be concerned that California-based groups would entice Soviet and other Eastern bloc athletes to defect. In Washington, the withdrawal was also viewed as a Soviet attempt to exercise a negative influence on President Reagan's re-election campaign. Soviet athletes, including gymnast Natalia Yurchenko and high jumper Tamara Bykova, were considered gold medal contenders. According to Soviet commentator Joseph Adamov, who frequently discusses his nation's ties with Washington, the withdrawal decision "is final". Soviet coach Valery Kiselev, speaking in Sydney, Australia, on May 9, hinted that there might still be a Soviet presence in the Los Angeles games. And to stimulate the controversy further, International Olympic Committee President Juan Antonio Samaranch announced in Washington on May 8 that he would leave shortly for Moscow in an attempt to convince the Soviets to reverse their pull-out decision.

    Source: NBC/REUTERS FILE/REUTERS SIDNEY

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA5ZFJPZDM5LBK9H77TJ71T8EAI
    Media URN:
    VLVA5ZFJPZDM5LBK9H77TJ71T8EAI
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    10/05/1984
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:29:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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