• Short Summary

    Squatters, who were forced out of their makeshift homes when South African authorities demolished them on May 22 seemed destined to find a new home in a government-sponsored self help scheme.

  • Description

    CAPETOWN MAY 22 (Rubython)


    1.
    GV Squatters' camp, people living in tents. (11 SHOTS)
    0.59

    2.
    GVs Women building a tent. (3 SHOTS)
    1.16

    3.
    GV Brick hall.
    1.19

    4.
    SVs Women and children sitting inside. (2 SHOTS)
    1.33


    BOTCHABELLA MAY 23 (BBC)


    5.
    GV Drought-stricken squatters camp, people with blankets sitting around. (9 SHOTS)
    2.13

    6.
    GVs, SVs Cemetery.
    2.17

    7.
    GV Grave being decorated.
    2.21

    8.
    CU Toys and children belongings at a grave. (3 SHOTS)
    2.31

    9.
    GV Possessions piled up.
    2.39

    10.
    GV Toilets.
    2.44

    11.
    GV Residents standing around.
    2.50




    Initials CC/JRS





    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: Squatters, who were forced out of their makeshift homes when South African authorities demolished them on May 22 seemed destined to find a new home in a government-sponsored self help scheme. Following the outcry that followed the tear-gas expulsion assault on the KTC camp in Capetown, the South African government has announced that a one-thousand-site camp will be set up for them at Driftsands 40 kilometres (25 miles) from the city. But it will only be for "legal" squatters, who the authorities define as those who qualify on the grounds of residence or birth in the area. For the other squatters - the more than 40,000 "illegal" - it is an offence to remain in the Capetown area for more than 72 hours. There is some uncertainty what the government intends to do about another group: the 900 Nyanga tent town squatters. Two hundred of the KTC 'legal' squatters have now been housed in deserted beerhalls pending their transfer to Driftsands. As the squatters of Capetown wonder where they will find shelter, the subsistence farmers of Botchabella, many miles to the north - in the Orange Free State - are finding South Africa's drought hard to cope with. Because of the apartheid laws, 200,000 blacks have been forced to try and make their living in Botchabella, on land that has been burnt dry. There may be shelter in Botchabella, but until the rains come there is little future.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA6HKMLLXBLCUDBI03XXDP9SOG9
    Media URN:
    VLVA6HKMLLXBLCUDBI03XXDP9SOG9
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    23/05/1983
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:38:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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