• Short Summary

    VARIOUS LOCATIONS

    There's has been a wary Soviet response to the latest arms proposals from America's President Ronald Reagan.

  • Description

    1. GV President Reagan speaking on television in USA. (SOT) 0.11
    2. CU Michael Heseltine speaking. (SOT) 0.23
    3. CU & SV Germans watching Reagan speech on television. (4 SHOTS) 0.37
    4. GVs UK Greenham Common women at peace camp. (6 SHOTS) 0.58
    5. SV Monsignor Bruce Xent, Chairman of Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament speaking. (SOT) 1.06
    6. CU Gennady Gerasimov, Diplomatic Correspondent of Novosti press agency, interviewed on television. 1.41
    7. GV ZOOM IN TO SV Venue of Geneva arms talks. 1.47
    8. GV ZOOM IN TO SV Soviet negotiator speaking. (English SOT) 2.14
    9. SV & CU Former US Arms Agency director, Eugene Rostow speaking. (SOT) (2 SHOTS) 2.30
    10. GV & SV Former National Security advisor Zbigniew Brzezinski speaking. (SOT) (2 SHOTS) 2.46
    TRANSCRIPT: HESELTINE: (SEQ 2) "I think the vast majority of people would have wanted to see the zero option. But having failed to get it because the Soviets won't let us have it, then I think it's absolutely right that we should go for a second-best solution.
    KENT: (SEQ 5)"Because when he started he said clearly this is it, zero option, that's it and no trading off. Now he's starting to do some deals. So in that sense it's a victory.
    GERASIMOV: (SEQ 6)" I don't see much progress, because this offer supposes that the United States are going to introduce nuclear missiles in Europe... and, er, you cannot be a little pregnant. It means that the process will go on and they will get all the missiles they want. It was very heavily advertized as a kind of a breakthrough, just like a hen laying an egg... but maybe it is an Easter egg in the sense that it is prepared for Easter peace marches."
    REPORTER: (SEQ 8) "You said when you first came here that America's approach to disarmament talks was unco-operative. You said that when you arrived?"
    SOVIET NEGOTIATOR: "Yes, and I can prove that."
    REPORTER: "You still feel that way?"
    SOVIET NEGOTIATOR: "Yes."
    REPORTER: "Even after President Reagan's speech?"
    SOVIET NEGOTIATOR: "Even more so after President Reagan's speech."
    REPORTER:"Why do you say that, even more?"
    SOVIET NEGOTIATOR: "Because it's not constructive."
    ROSTOW: (SEQ 9) "It's disappointing that they were unwilling to take the zero proposal but this approach represents I think a sound way forward."
    BRZEZINSKI: (SEQ 10) "We should accelerate deployment to show the Soviets that we're serious, and to make it more difficult for them to stir up Western German public opinion pressures against eventual deployment."
    InitialsWS/JRS


    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: VARIOUS LOCATIONS

    There's has been a wary Soviet response to the latest arms proposals from America's President Ronald Reagan. He suggested in a major television speech that the two superpowers should establish equal numbers in land-based medium-range nuclear missiles stationed in Europe. Mr. Reagan made it clear his offer was an interim proposal to reduce numbers, until an agreement to eliminate them all could be reached. Moscow Radio said the plan amounted to a 'new edition' of Reagan's "zero option", which offered to cancel deployment of Pershing-2 and Cruise missiles in Western Europe if the Soviet Union dismantled its own, comparable, weapons. Moscow rejected the zero option. Britain's Defense Secretary, Michael Haseltine, who's been visiting British troops in West Berlin, said he thought most people would have preferred the zero option, but that it was 'absolutely right' to go for a second-best solution. Reagan's offer came on the eve of Easter protests against nuclear weapons by peace groups all over Europe. In England, women peace protesters were planning a 'human chain' linking a Cruise missile base at Greenham Common and a weapons factory. The chairman of the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament (CND) Monsignor Bruce Kent said he thought Reagan had backed down. But a Soviet arms negotiator in Geneva dismissed the offer as 'not constructive'.

    Source: BBC/NBC

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA6KBJ1Y5XZ4P0U74V0AWFCLGA1
    Media URN:
    VLVA6KBJ1Y5XZ4P0U74V0AWFCLGA1
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    31/03/1983
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:46:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

Comments (0)

We always welcome comments and more information about our films.
All posts are reactively checked. Libellous and abusive comments are forbidden.

Add your comment