• Short Summary

    INTRODUCTION: Throughout the Soviet Union, officials have been gathering and submitting data for plans covering social and economic development during the next decade.

  • Description

    1.
    GVs Trucks moving along road in Tadzhik Republic (2 shots)
    0.11

    2.
    GV, SV & CU Hillside PAN TO river (3 shots)
    0.26

    3.
    GV Reservoir behind completed Nurekskaya power station
    0.35

    4.
    GV PAN Power station
    0.43

    5.
    INTERIOR GV & SV Technicians at panels and working at desk (3 shots)
    0.54

    6.
    AERIAL VIEW SV ZOOM OUT TO GV Power station complex
    0.58

    7.
    SV Pylons on hillside PAN TO electrical installations (2 shots)
    1.07

    8.
    GV Pylons and electrical lines TILT UP TO condensers
    1.10

    9.
    GV PULL BACK TO LV Power station and community buildings
    1.20




    Initials BB





    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: INTRODUCTION: Throughout the Soviet Union, officials have been gathering and submitting data for plans covering social and economic development during the next decade. These plans will be considered and adopted at the 26th party congress in Moscow next month (February). Among the multitude of projects to be considered is a complex of five hydro-electric power stations in the Tadzhik Republic in southeast Soviet Central Asia.

    SYNOPSIS: The Tadzhik Republic spreads through more than 55,000 square miles ( 43,000 sq. kilometres), with much on its mountainous terrain above 10,000 feet (3,000 metres) altitude. Two neighbouring countries are China and Afghanistan. Earthquakes are common, and there is a dense river network. The complex of five power stations is to be built on the Vakhsh River, and the first station is already completed.

    This station, called the Nurekskaya, is the largest in Central Asia, with a capacity of generating almost two and three quarter million kilowatts of energy. It also plays an important role in irrigation, in a region where river levels normally drop sharply in summer months.

    The dam has formed what local people 'refer to as the Nurekskoye "Sea", which stores the water to irrigate some two million hectares (4,942,110 acres) of arid land. Improved irrigation is said to mean a potential increase of 300 million roubles (1.14 billion U.S. dollars) in agricultural revenues. Engineers said the 300-metres-long dam is unique: it contains new engineering ideas allowing it to withstand strong underground tremors in this zone of regular seismic activity. Despite its heavy aid to irrigation, this station's main aim is to provide cheap hydro-electricity in southern Tadzhikstan.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA6N8MCWBSX0QZW8INFY4J2S09O
    Media URN:
    VLVA6N8MCWBSX0QZW8INFY4J2S09O
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    12/01/1981
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:19:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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