• Short Summary

    The United States National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has developed and launched a series of Orbiting Space Observatories (OSO) which could eventually help scientists tap the vast power resources of the sun.

  • Description

    1.
    TRACKING SHOT Sun (2 shots)
    0.16

    2.
    GV & CU Satellite OSO-7
    0.26

    3.
    CU Sign on wall and door 'OSO' "Orbiting Solar Observatory" PAN TO INT. OSO Control at Goddard Spaceflight Centre (5 shots)
    0.48

    4.
    CU Data displays and computer (2 shots)
    1.00

    5.
    GV & CU High-speed printer
    1.09

    6.
    CU & GV Computer (3 shots)
    1.25

    7.
    SV ZOOM TO CU solar heat display
    2.06

    8.
    GV EXT. telescope
    2.11

    9.
    CU Scientist looking through telescope (3 shots)
    2.22

    10.
    GV's and CU's recapitulation of previous shots (11 shots)
    2.51

    11.
    GV Sun setting
    2.54


    The distance between the earth and sun is 93-million miles. The sun is the only start we can see in great detail, with energy so massive it affects everything on or near our planet....from communications and weather to astronauts travelling in space.



    To study the sun, NASA has launched a series of orbiting solar observatories like this most recent one...the twelve hundred pound OSO-7....



    This is OSO Control in Greenbelt Maryland. It is form here....the Goddard Space Centre....that the Orbiting Solar Observatory is commanded and controlled. Goddard co-ordinates the efforts of some six ground tracking and receiving stations, including ones located in South Africa, Australia, Ecuador and Chile. These stations receive data from OSO as it passes overhead, and then relay it on to Goddard.



    Here too, the satellite's electronic pulse is constantly monitored. High-speed printers that can print from six hundred to one thousand words per minute record and digest millions of pl??? of data returned by OSO.



    Example....OSO can store 5-million, 210-thousand bits of date in a single orbit of the earth....and then send all of it to a ground station in 5 1/2 minutes. Scientists world like to map the entire sun to get a clearer picture of what's going on up there and the su???. One of the ways they do this is with a computerised colour display.



    Hot, active regions of the sun are indicated by the bright colours....blacks, purples and the dimmer shades mean that there is less activity. The computer-generated map of the sun's corona gives scientists a look at the relatively cooler polar ??? and temperature ranges from 900-thousand to 72-million degrees. It also tells them the intensity of radiation in a given area.



    An optical ground-based observatory located at Goddard is pointed towards the sun. If a disturbance occurs like a solar flare of a solar storm, the OSO spacecraft can be command to aim its telescope at the disturbance.



    Computers, teletypes, high-speed printers, data storage....all are information handlers. OSO Control receives, stores, and then passes on the data to scientific experimenters to analyse. Understanding solar physics is indispensable to understanding the procession that affect earth and the other planets. Knowledge gained from spacecraft like the Orbiting Solar Observatory may even one day aid physicists in finding an unlimited and pollution-free power-source for earth.




    Initials OS/1808 OS/1825


    This official NASA film shows the various processes by which OSO information is collected and stored for later perusal by scientists. It is accompanied by a commentary-on-film throughout. We provide an alternative commentary overleaf, but a transcript of the NASA commentary is also included.
    USA: NASA-DEVELOPED SPACE OBSERVATORIES SEARCH FOR WAYS OR EXPLOITING SUN'S ENERGY.
    SPEAKER OVER MUSIC: THIS SECTION RETAINED IN ALTERNATIVE COMMENTARY.
    This film is serviced to you to help fill the gap in film shipments expected as a result of the world-wide airline pilots strike on June 19th.

    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: The United States National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has developed and launched a series of Orbiting Space Observatories (OSO) which could eventually help scientists tap the vast power resources of the sun.

    The satellites are launched into an orbit around Earth where they can inspect the surface of the sun, checking areas of relative coolness and looking for solar flares -- sudden bursts of activity on the sun -- and radiation spots.

    The information collected by the satellite is passed back via six ground receiving stations to the OSO Control, based at the Goddard Space Centre in Maryland. Here the information is collated. It is this data that could well lead scientists to a breakthrough in their efforts to harness the energy resources of the sun -- resources that generate up to 72-million degrees at its point of origin.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA6S0AIPEPNU0GIFHTQY386Z5CX
    Media URN:
    VLVA6S0AIPEPNU0GIFHTQY386Z5CX
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    16/06/1972
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:54:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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