• Short Summary

    JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA

    In South Africa, a leading churchman told a meeting in Johannesburg on January 22 that the political groups which accepted plans for constitutional reform would share the blame for constitution of the country's apartheid policies.

  • Description

    1. GV Speakers on platform 0.05
    2. GV Crowd in hall 0.07
    3. SV & GV Doctor Allan Boesak, president of the World Alliance of Reformed Churches, walks onto platform and is cheered (2 shots) 0.29
    4. SV & GV Dr. Boesak speaks as crowd listens (SOT) (9 shots) 3.26
    TRANSCRIPT (SEQUENCE FOUR):
    BOESAK: "Internally the courageous resistance to apartheid and the determination of black South Africans to be free, have made it clear to white South Africans in no certain terms that there can be no peaceful existence for them in this land unless it is also peaceful co-existence with blacks. Little by little, the international community has come to understand the danger this policy poses to the stability of the region and to international peace. The total rejection by black people of the policies of the present government has put the lie to the government's claim that apartheid is the solution to all problems. The shame of racism and the brutal violence which is needed to sustain this system, the naked greed and the breath-taking hypocrisy, the sheer dishonesty in the so-called changes that are taking place, all of this now stands exposed for all who have eyes to see. And our response to the crisis facing us today is a dialectical one. It is what I call the politics of refusal which has within it, both the "yes" and the "no". We must continue to struggle for liberation, for freedom and human dignity of all people of South Africa. And so while we say "yes" to this struggle, we say "no" to apartheid, racial segregation and economic exploitation of the oppressed masses in South Africa. We must continue to show South Africa and the world that there are black people who refuse to be intimidated by the violence of apartheid or tempted by the sugar-coated fruits of apartheid. So while we say no to hollow solutions, built on personal gain and pretty self-interest, we say yes to integrity and commitment. We must continue to work for a safe and secure future for our children, and for a society where... .....they will no longer be infected by the poison of racism. And so while we say yes to a future built on genuine peace and justice, we say no to building that future on the participation and greed, exploitation and a narrow little nationalism that carry within themselves the seed of their destruction. We must refuse to let our children die in a war which is being waged for the protection of apartheid and South Africa's new colonialist designs in Namibia and for frustrating the hopes of the Namibian people for freedom, democracy and (indistinct due to applause) ......"
    InitialsAL/BB


    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA

    In South Africa, a leading churchman told a meeting in Johannesburg on January 22 that the political groups which accepted plans for constitutional reform would share the blame for constitution of the country's apartheid policies. Doctor Allan Boesak, president of the World Alliance of Reformed Church, told Congress of the indian Council that the white minority government plans should be rejected because they excluded the majority of South African from power. Doctor Boesak said that Prime Minister, P.W. Botha, was trying to create an illusion of change so that Western governments could openly support his administration. The meeting was also addressed by Mrs. Helen Joseph, the first white woman to be placed under house arrest, and Mr. Thozamile Gqweta, president of the South African Allied workers Union. Doctor Boesak said there could be no co-operation with the government in prolonging the policies of apartheid and said these policies themselves were a recipe for violent confrontation. The constitutional changes propose a three chamber parliament of whites, coloreds and Indians, but they also exclude 70 per cent of the black population. Doctor Boesak called the proposals "breathtaking" in their dishonesty and called for continue struggle for full democratic freedom. He said black South African should not allow themselves to be intimidated by the violence of apartheid and gave warning to the rest of the world of the danger of apartheid to the long term political and economic stability of the area.

    Source: REUTERS - LOUIS BREYTENBACH

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA6VR9UHZXYCZD629Z7BLPLT85H
    Media URN:
    VLVA6VR9UHZXYCZD629Z7BLPLT85H
    Group:
    Reuters - Including Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    23/01/1983
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:03:33:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

Comments (0)

We always welcome comments and more information about our films.
All posts are reactively checked. Libellous and abusive comments are forbidden.

Add your comment