• Short Summary

    Victims of South Africa's system of 'apartheid' were remembered at a special service in London, on Tuesday (26 June).

  • Description

    1.
    GV TILT DOWN Westminster Abbey.
    0.06

    2.
    GV Crosses marking deaths in South Africa with man reading out names.
    0.18

    3.
    SV Cross for Steve Biko and others.
    0.40

    4.
    CU Vice-President of Patriotic Front, Josiah Chinamano, holding cross for Solomon Mahlangu.
    0.45

    5.
    SV Woman holding cross for eight-year old girl shot dead in 1976.
    0.50

    6.
    SV Other crosses.
    1.02

    7.
    CU Exiled Namibian Bishop Colin Winter (saluting right) next to cross for Martha Seleke.
    1.14

    8.
    SV & GV Crowd attending ceremony. (2 SHOTS)
    1.25


    The Anti-Apartheid Movement was founded in London on 26 June, 1959 in response to an appeal by Chief Albert Luthuli -- a Nobel Peace Prize winner and the then president of the African National Congress of South Africa.




    Initials JS/



    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: Victims of South Africa's system of 'apartheid' were remembered at a special service in London, on Tuesday (26 June). The memorial service coincided with the twentieth anniversary of the founding of the Anti-Apartheid Movement, which has been at the forefront of a campaign to change South Africa's racialist policies.

    SYNOPSIS: The memorial service was held in Westminster Abbey. The organisers chose twenty names of people who they said had died at the hands of South Africa's security forces. Each name was inscribed on a cross.

    Among those commemorated was the black nationalist leader, Steve Biko, who died while being detained by the south African police. The anti-Apartheid Movement said the twenty names represent the many hundreds more who had also died. Another opponent of the South African Government remembered at the ceremony was solomon Mahlangu. He was executed this year for alleged "terrorist" offences.

    Another victim was an eight-year-old girl -- shot dead in the Soweto uprising in June, 1976. The twenty crosses were later planted in the grounds of Westminster Abbey where they will remain as a permanent reminder of the Soweto riots and those who've died while in police detention. Also attending the ceremony was Bishop Colin Winter. He was expelled by the south African authorities from his diocese in Namibia in 1972, and he joined the growing numbers of South African dissidents living abroad.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA75ZP0JG8XRP93ZMQZIARQE3TW
    Media URN:
    VLVA75ZP0JG8XRP93ZMQZIARQE3TW
    Group:
    Reuters - Including Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    26/06/1979
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:24:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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