• Short Summary

    SALISBURY, ZIMBABWE

    INTRODUCTION: Zimbabwe's witch doctors have staged a festival to demonstrate what they believe to be the relevance of traditional African medicine in the modern world.

  • Description

    SALISBURY, ZIMBABWE

    GV People gathered in stadium. 0.06
    SV Crowd around witch doctor. (2 SHOTS) 0.23
    SV Witch doctor talking to patient. 0.30
    CU Spectator speaking to newsmen. 1.06
    SV Witch doctor with spectators. 1.08
    CU PULL BACK Young baby TO witch doctor singing. (2 SHOTS) 1.21
    CU Contents of witch doctor's bag. 1.26
    SV Witch doctors dancing in front of crowd. 1.39

    SPEECH (TRANSCRIPT) (SEQ. 4) REPORTER: "Can you tell us what you think of Ngangas?"
    MAN: "No, this Ngangas, some of them are true, some of them aren't true. You know, some of them you know, it's a bit of advertising their association. I've been other prices, there they said they know anything. They're asking them of they're telling us not true things."
    REPORTER: "And when you're ill who do you consult? Do you consult a doctor, a conventional doctor or a Ngangas?"
    MAN: "Some doctors are good, you know. Some Ngangas are good for some diseases. They can be cured by European things you know. That's the way we believe."

    Background: SALISBURY, ZIMBABWE

    INTRODUCTION: Zimbabwe's witch doctors have staged a festival to demonstrate what they believe to be the relevance of traditional African medicine in the modern world. During the festival, the witch doctors gave their services free to members of the audience.

    SYNOPSIS: Around two thousand people attended the gathering in Salisbury's Gwanzura Stadium.

    The witch doctors, known as Ngangas, have found their practice under throat in recent years from modern medicine and, in many African countries, disapproving authorities. But they maintain that 'indigenous medicine', as it's called, is effective. And there have been examples of healing by witch doctors in Africa which their modern counterparts have been unable to explain.

    One spectator spoke to a reporter about his attitude towards witch doctors.

    Zimbabwe has about 4,000 witch doctors and spirit mediums, who combine medicine and religion in rituals which often use spells and trances to achieve their effect.

    Although the contents of a Nganga's bag may be unfamiliar to Western eyes, they're the tools of his trade just as much as the instruments of a Western doctor. And there are few doctors from Europe who can dance like a Nganga from Zimbabwe.

    Source: REUTERS - CHRIS EVERSON

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA7KCFQ4H52XOA1CE5BGB0KEI4M
    Media URN:
    VLVA7KCFQ4H52XOA1CE5BGB0KEI4M
    Group:
    Reuters - Including Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    07/09/1981
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:39:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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