• Short Summary

    MEXICO CITY, MEXICO

    Representatives from more than 150 nations have gathered in Mexico City from August 6th to August 13th for the first major United Nations Conference on world population since the Conference in Bucharest in 1974.

  • Description

    1. SV & GV People arriving at bus depot (4 shots) 0.13
    2. GV & SV Town and looming factory in background (2 shots) 0.23
    3. CVs Poor people at home with children walking around (3 shots) 0.39
    4. SV PAN Woman in her home 0.44
    5. GV ZOOM IN Village (not named) 0.50
    6. GV Men and children collecting trash (4 shots) 1.08
    7. GVs Mexican President Miguel de la Madrid arrives at conference hall accompanied by his wife (2 shots) 1.29
    8. CU Conference sign PULL BACK TO GV Crowded hall awaiting Mexican President (2 shots) 1.44
    9. GV Crowd applauding AND ZOOM TO President walking into hall 1.57
    10. Director of UN Population Fund, Raphael Salas goes to lectern and delivers speech (2 shots) 2.20
    InitialsCG/BB


    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: MEXICO CITY, MEXICO

    Representatives from more than 150 nations have gathered in Mexico City from August 6th to August 13th for the first major United Nations Conference on world population since the Conference in Bucharest in 1974. In the last decade the annual growth rate of the world's population has declined from two per cent to 1.7 per cent, but that has still led to an increase of over 770 million -- bringing the world's population to 4.75 billion people. The World Bank estimates that by the year 2025 there could be as many as 8.3 billion people. In spite of widespread concern over this population increase, the United States has adopted a controversial policy against using abortion as a population control. The U.S. has declared it will not contribute to family planning programmes that support abortion. The U.S. approach has caused concern among other delegations. Geronimo Martinez, Secretary General of Mexico's National Population Council said the conference could not accept that international aid be conditioned to the formula of a certain population policy. Leader of the U.S. delegation, James Buckley replied that the U.S. fully recognises the sovereign right of nations to determine their own policies, but "others should recognise that we have the sovereign right to determine under what conditions we will extend help." Despite the impending row, it was smiles all round as Mexico's President Miguel de la Madrid opened the conference. Raphael Salas, Director of the UN Population Fund, said reduction of world population growth rates makes population the only issue so far in which nations have some success in reaching a goal they had agreed upon. "Our goal is the stabilisation of global populations within the shortest period possible before the next century." Recognising the difficulties involved, Salas admitted that rapid growth, slowly growing incomes and insufficient levels of technology in the developing countries, has led to a widening gap between rich and poor nations and that a realistic world population plan of action
    will be necessary if the gap is to narrow.

    Source: REUTERS - MUNOZ/NBC/UNTV

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA7M88NGUFLXDMDWCSOPSHWQ82A
    Media URN:
    VLVA7M88NGUFLXDMDWCSOPSHWQ82A
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    06/08/1984
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:21:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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