• Short Summary

    Increasing approval of modern art in the Soviet Union is shown by the popularity of a museum in Yerevan, the capital of Armenia.

  • Description

    1.
    GV Museum of Modern Art in yerevan, Armenia
    0.03

    2.
    GV INTERIOR OF Museum
    0.08

    3.
    CU Painting 'No to Neutron bomb'
    0.11

    4.
    GV PAN Exhibits in museum
    0.16

    5.
    CU PULL BACK TO SV Abstract painting
    0.21

    6.
    SV Two paintings (2 SHOTS)
    0.30

    7.
    CU Painting PAN & ZOOM OUT TO 'Portrait against red background'
    0.37

    8.
    GV PAN Visitors looking at exhibits
    0.46

    9.
    SV & CU Visitors looking at 'Fish still life' ZOOM INTO CU of still life
    0.56

    10.
    SCU PAN ACROSS three paintings
    1.18

    11.
    SV paintings PAN ACROSS TO visitor
    1.10

    12.
    SCU ZOOM INTO CU Painting
    1.18

    13.
    CU ZOOM OUT TO SV Two more modern paintings
    1.23

    14.
    CU ZOOM OUT TO SV Visitors admiring paintings
    1.31



    Initials JJ/1825



    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: Increasing approval of modern art in the Soviet Union is shown by the popularity of a museum in Yerevan, the capital of Armenia. It is the only one of its kind in the Soviet Union, and displays a wide range of avant-garde art.

    SYNOPSIS: The Museum of Modern Art has some six hundred works on display. This one, called 'No to the Neutron bomb', was painted in 1977 by Akop Akopyan.

    Officials say there are no limitations on the manner or style of exhibits, although they point out the museum is not seeking 'curious specimens'. Restrictions on modern art are being relaxed gradually in the Soviet Union. Two years ago, an avant-garde exhibition in Moscow was given last-minute approval after almost a year of haggling over which artists and works to include. 'Portrait against a red background', by Henrich Yelabekyan, is an example of modern painting to gain official approval.

    This work, 'Fish still life' is by the same artist. The museum says no distinction s made between well-known and obscure artists--all contributions are judged on merit alone. But one condition s that the artist must be prepared to present his work to the city, or to the Armenian republic.

    There is still no question of displaying art that does not meet the standards of 'socialist realism', or political convention. Last year, one of the Soviet Union's best-known artists insisted on including in an exhibition a painting denounced by the authorities as an 'anti-Soviet caricature'. Police closed the show.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA813MPAS2V7JXXS3M9998OTR5T
    Media URN:
    VLVA813MPAS2V7JXXS3M9998OTR5T
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    19/10/1978
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:32:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

Comments (0)

We always welcome comments and more information about our films.
All posts are reactively checked. Libellous and abusive comments are forbidden.

Add your comment