• Short Summary

    INTRODUCTION: The government in Kampuchea has begun a campaign to reconstruct the country after the devastation caused during the Pol Pot regime's four years in power.

  • Description

    1.
    GV Hospital building with bullet scars on walls (2 shots)
    0.11

    2.
    CU Red Cross ambulance
    0.16

    3.
    CU INTERIOR Drug making, mixing up powder, being fed into machine
    0.21

    4.
    CU Glutinour being added to table machine
    0.24

    5.
    CU Powder being mixed
    0.30

    6.
    CU Tablets in revolving drum being examined (3 shots)
    0.38

    7.
    CU Machine producing tablets and tablets being weighed into packs (2 shots)
    0.54

    8.
    CU Capsules being sorted
    1.00

    9.
    CU Bottles of drugs on table
    1.04

    10.
    SV Girls labelling bottles (2 shots)
    1.14

    11.
    GV Entrance to school, children filing into classrooms (4 shots)
    1.36

    12.
    SV INTERIOR Children in classroom PAN TO teacher (3 shots)
    1.48

    13.
    GV Orphanage children playing netball
    2.06

    14.
    CU INTERIOR Bomb-damaged floor (2 shots)
    2.19

    15.
    SV Orphans entering dining room, eating rice (2 shots)
    2.30

    16.
    SV Children sitting on floor eating, and standing up eating (2 shots)
    2.45

    17.
    CU Young children eating
    2.51




    Initials PM





    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: INTRODUCTION: The government in Kampuchea has begun a campaign to reconstruct the country after the devastation caused during the Pol Pot regime's four years in power. During that era, schools and hospitals were hit especially hard. Hundreds of thousands of people were left ill, undernourished, and illiterate as a legacy of the Pol Pot years. In 1979, a new Government was imposed by Vietnamese force of arms. Film just received from Kampuchea shows the progress that has been made since then.

    SYNOPSIS: Hospitals like this suffered grievously during the fighting that began and ended the Pol Pot era. Worse still was the impact on the Kampucheans themselves. Millions died, and of the 3 1/2 - million survivors, almost all were in bad health. When Western agencies arrived in Kampuchea in 1979, one of their worst problems was the shortage of medicines. So they began manufacturing their own in makeshift factories in Phnom Penh.

    The United Nations Children Fund, UNICEF, is at present trying to wind down its field of operations in Kampuchea. It wants local people to run the schemes that were hastily set up in the emergency of 1979. Some work at this drug factory, one of three established in the capital. It is responsible for manufacture of tablets and capsules, and supplies the whole of Kampuchea.

    The three drug factories in Phnom Penh have produced 77 tons of pills and capsules -- vital to a population hit by tuberculosis, malaria, anaemia, as well as malnutrition and war wounds.

    It is not only hospitals that suffered during the crisis in Kampuchea. Schools were also badly hit. The country's education system was virtually halted during the Pol Pot years. Most children under the age of 11 cannot read or write. Now there is a revival of education throughout the battered country.

    This school in Svay Rieng is one of hundreds opened in the past two years. In the surrounding province, 64,000 pupils are getting the first education they've known. Some are as old s 14, -- and share the same classrooms as six-year-old -- anxious to catch up on the education denied to them.

    The children also need homes. With their parents killed in their thousands, one of Kampuchea's urgent needs is orphanages.

    This one was set up in a former high school, It was used as an ammunition dump by Pol Pot's soldiers. They blew it up before retreating in front of advancing Vietnamese troops in 1979. During the Pol Pot years, children as young as 12 were used as soldiers. Many others were executed.

    Hunger was so bad at one time that people were forced to eat leaves and roots to stay alive. Since then, huge supplies of rice have been shipped in by Western relief agencies, and production has recovered in Kampuchea itself. But real economic security is still a long way off.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA84QELEMG63V39AQEDLYP3J5K5
    Media URN:
    VLVA84QELEMG63V39AQEDLYP3J5K5
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    05/03/1981
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:52:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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