• Short Summary

    King Hassan of Morocco has begun to make good an earlier pledge to lead his kingdom back to "parliamentary democracy".

  • Description

    1.
    GV EXTERIOR Parliamentary building
    0.05

    2.
    SV King Hassan takes his seat on dais, members of parliament seat themselves
    0.22

    3.
    SV Government officials looking on
    0.26

    4.
    GV PAN Members seated in chamber
    0.37

    5.
    LV, ???SV & CU King Hassan speaking (3 shots)
    0.48

    6.
    CU Members
    0.51

    7.
    GV King and entire assembly rise, members applaud
    1.05

    8.
    LV & SV King leaves building at head of group (2 shots)
    1.28


    The new government has a majority of Independents, who declare themselves to be "unconditional monarchists". The Istiqlal Party have the second largest representation. Other parties represented are the Movement Populaire, and the Moroccan Labour Federation. A major opposition group which isn't represented, the Socialist Union Party, has alleged the elections were "falsified" and that the Independents were in fact "a very well-organised Government party".




    Initials BB/1940



    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: King Hassan of Morocco has begun to make good an earlier pledge to lead his kingdom back to "parliamentary democracy". In June, he allowed democratic elections to be held for the first, and, on Friday (14 October), he welcomed the resulting new government to the opening of its first parliamentary session.

    SYNOPSIS: For the past few years, King Hassan has ruled the country by decree, but at a British-style State opening of parliament at Rabat, he opened the way for what he calls a "democratic experiment". The new 260-seat Parliament was elected in June by both direct suffrage and indirect vote, with a large majority going to the monarchist Independents.

    However, for the first time, several other parties are also represented in the Moroccan Parliament. They include the major opposition group, the Rightist Istiqlal Party, and two minor parties. King Hassan told the new government he was tired of "a conspiracy of silence" and asked new Cabinet members to speak out on Morocco's problems.

    In 1970, Morocco had been set for general elections but the main parties boycotted them, claiming they were "rigged". Later, a so-called "rubber stamp" parliament was dissolved, and King Hassan has survived several attempted military coups.

    Since then, the King has ruled by decree, but his position became more secure with the success of his campaign to take over part of the Western Sahara from Spain. He has yet to squash all international opposition to his Sahara takeover, but some observers say he could do so by boosting democracy at home.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA8IMDXU7I8W3P5308PUILKVZ0
    Media URN:
    VLVA8IMDXU7I8W3P5308PUILKVZ0
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    16/10/1977
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:28:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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