• Short Summary

    In El Salvador leftists who oppose the ruling junta called for a protest march on wednesday (5 December) in the capital of San Salvador.

  • Description

    1.
    GV AND SV, GV El Rosario Church with banners in San Salvador (2 shots)
    0.11

    2.
    GV Men outside church as loudspeaker calls out message (3 shots)
    0.27

    3.
    GV AND SV Demonstrators with banners gathering for march (2 shots)
    0.35

    4.
    SV AND GV Demonstrators placing banners on statues as loudspeaker carries announcement (3 shots)
    0.51

    5.
    GV AND SV Demonstrators gathering as man continues to speak over loudspeaker (5 shots)
    1.17

    6.
    GV AND SV Demonstrators marching through streets with banners (2 shots)
    1.38

    7.
    GV Demonstrators continue march through streets chanting (2 shots)
    2.02



    Initials dn



    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: In El Salvador leftists who oppose the ruling junta called for a protest march on wednesday (5 December) in the capital of San Salvador. But less than a thousand demonstrators turned out to protest the detention of political prisoners and to call for higher wages and an end to inflation.

    SYNOPSIS: El Rosario Church in San Salvador is occupied by a group of factory workers, members of the leftist group -- the Popular Revolutionary Block (PRB).

    Several members of the group stood outside the church to publicise their occupation and to call for followers to join a protest march through the city. Continued protests against the ruling junta have led to rumours that a coup was a possibility.

    The organisers were disappointed by the turn-out. But theirs was the latest in a series of protest that have disrupted the small Central American country in the last few months. The day before, security forces used tear gas to drive out strikers from a cotton plantation they had seized to back demands for a wage increase.

    The leftists criticise the detention of some of their sympathisers. They say they say they are being held without trial. According to a military spokesman the workers at the occupied cotton plantation were dispersed by tear gas. Nine other cotton plantations were still being held by strikers, who were campaigning for a fifty percent increase in wages to about six dollars a month.

    In early November the Popular Revolutionary Block which represents between thirty and sixty thousand workers and students held a march in the capital to demand social and economic reforms. At that time the junta agreed to examine many of their demands.

    The PRB's demands then included a one hundred percent pay rise for all workers, and information on alleged political prisoners or missing people. More than a month later the group continues to march to bring attention to the same issues. And they have pledged to continue their campaign.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA8NGHDXBHDPEQ5586KNJTKFOS1
    Media URN:
    VLVA8NGHDXBHDPEQ5586KNJTKFOS1
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    07/12/1979
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:02:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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