• Short Summary

    INTRODUCTION: Zimbabweans are in the process of building themselves a new nation after a destructive seven-year war which preceded full independence.

  • Description

    1.
    GV Zimbabwe countryside.
    0.03

    2.
    LV PAN & SV Destroyed Elephant Hills hotel. (4 SHOTS)
    0.21

    3.
    GV PAN FROM Montclair Hotel TO rebuilt wing.
    0.32

    4.
    CU & SV Guests seated in garden. (2 SHOTS)
    0.37

    5.
    GV & SV Tourists arriving at Victoria Falls airport. (2 SHOTS)
    0.46

    6.
    LV PAN & CU Africans playing Mbiras at Victoria Falls Hotel. (2 SHOTS)
    1.05

    7.
    CU & LV PAN Sign "A' Zambezi River Lodge" and from tourists relaxing round swimming pool TO accommodation.
    1.22

    8.
    SV Elephants with handler.
    1.38

    9.
    SV PAN & CU Tourists looking at crocodiles. (4 SHOTS)
    1.55

    10.
    GV PAN, SV & TVs Tourists photographing Victoria Falls. (4 SHOTS)
    2.26

    11.
    AERIAL VIEW OF Falls.
    2.35




    Initials JS





    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: INTRODUCTION: Zimbabweans are in the process of building themselves a new nation after a destructive seven-year war which preceded full independence. An urgent priority is to get the economy on to a sound footing. And over the next few years one of the lucrative sources of revenue for Africa's newest democracy is expected to be tourism.

    SYNOPSIS: Zimbabwe is a tourist's dream in reality.

    But camera-carrying visitors were almost non-existent as the former Smith regime fought against the bush armies who paved the way for Robert Mugabe's present government. Hotels like this, the Elephant Hills in the Eastern Highlands, were constant targets for the raiding guerrilla forces. But peace changed everything. Businessmen aware of the country's tourist potential are rebuilding with the hope of cashing in.

    Their belief in the pulling power of Zimbabwe's exotic countryside already seems justified. In 1979 only 65,000 people visited the country. In 1980 the figure rose dramatically to 227,000.

    However, not all the country's whites share the faith of those ensuring that tourism plays its part in building a prosperous Zimbabweans are still emigrating in droves, and their number is accelerating.

    Despite these problems and many more the country's tourist industry is making headway, thanks to the thousands who arrive every week to sample the comforts of hotels like this on the Zambezi River.

    They come from all over Europe and America for a brief insight into the African way of life. The abundance of wildlife in its natural habitat gives the visitor the feeling of being on a real-life safari. There are tame animals or something more ferocious to remember after the holiday's end.

    Countries the world over have learned that the greater affluence of the Western industrialised world has opened the doors to wider travel. Tourists are willing to pay handsomely for the opportunity of getting within camera range of wonders like the majestic Victoria Falls.

    Zimbabwe's overall economic growth for 1980 was an impressive 10 per cent in real terms. Tourism will help future growth.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA8NI1I9B9ZXB0MV8IWCIQ361HT
    Media URN:
    VLVA8NI1I9B9ZXB0MV8IWCIQ361HT
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    18/06/1981
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:37:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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