• Short Summary

    In Brazil, a ring of military police around Brasilia's Parliament building was withdrawn on April 25, at the start of a key debate on direct presidential elections.

  • Description

    GV AND CU INTERIOR Parliamentary debate, with Mario Juruna speaking as other MPS, wearing yellow ties, listen (4 shots)
    SV PULL BACK TO GV PAN Announcement of results in chamber, as MPs boo, raise fists and sing protest song (4 shots)

    Background: In Brazil, a ring of military police around Brasilia's Parliament building was withdrawn on April 25, at the start of a key debate on direct presidential elections. Roadblocks were also taken down to allow free access to the capital. Opposition supporters drove around the parliament buildings, blowing their car horns, others demonstrated on the lawns, in an atmosphere observers said was more like a carnival than a profound political moment in Brazil's history. Opponents of the military-backed government of President Joao Figueiredo hoped to push through parliament an amendment removing from the Constitution, a provision that an electoral college chooses the president. In Sao Paulo and Rio, the organisers of a four-month campaign for direct election called on supporters to stage demonstrations. Protesters, however, were denied live television coverage of the debate, because of censorship under presidential emergency measures. Crowds who had waited until the early hours to hear results telephoned from the capital, banged on cooking pots and chanted "The fight will continue"; the hot-blooded called for a general strike. Inside the chamber, MP's pledged to vote for the amendment wore yellow ties, the colour adopted by campaigners for direct elections. There were impassioned speeches by opposition leaders, including representatives of Indian ethnic minorities, such as Mario Juruna. But the opposition failed, after several hours of voting, to get the two-thirds majority needed to have the Senate vote on the motion. They failed even though 54 members of the government's Social Democratic Party (PDS) has defied the president's appeals for party solidarity, and voted for the amendment. A total of 113 PDS deputies followed the party line by leaving the chamber. Final voting: 298 in favour, 65 against, just 22 short of victory."

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA8P79FEN7X6KXC4YQCLAZ4EZVO
    Media URN:
    VLVA8P79FEN7X6KXC4YQCLAZ4EZVO
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    26/04/1984
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:03:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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