• Short Summary

    Badly-needed supplies of fertiliser and seed maize are moving into Zambia from South Africa via Rhodesia following Zambian President Kenneth Kaunda's decision earlier this month to open the railway line across the border with Rhodesia.

  • Description

    1.
    LV American ship at East London dock in South Africa
    0.03

    2.
    GV AND CU Fertiliser lifted out of ships hold by crane and loaded onto railway truck (3 SHOTS)
    0.35

    3.
    SV (NIGHT SHOTS) Lusaka station.
    0.38

    4.
    LV & CU Zambian railways engine pulls truck into station. (4 SHOTS)
    1.05

    5.
    SV & CU (DAY SHOTS) Workers off-loading seed maize and fertiliser and stacking same in yard. (5 SHOTS)
    1.33

    6.
    GV Railway trucks waiting to enter warehouse.
    1.36

    7.
    LV Sacks of soya meal being unloaded and stacked inside warehouse. (2 SHOTS)
    1.44

    8.
    SV & CU Sacks being laded onto truck. (2 SHOTS)
    1.55

    9.
    LV PAN & TV Empty waggons in goods yards waiting to be loaded with copper. (2 SHOTS)
    2.10

    1.
    Various outside the seed depot of the National Agriculture Marketing Board in the industrial area of Lusaka


    2.
    South African railway waggons being offloaded by enthusiastic workers wearing blue overalls. These are workers of the organisation and they offload manually ten to fifteen trucks per day.


    3.
    Workers offloading seed maize from the waggons


    4.
    Also hired are casual workers, who assist to offload as the badly-needed trucks have to be returned to South Africa. After the cargo is offloaded, the waggons are towed to the Copperbelt for lads of copper which has ben piling up in the course of the past months.


    5.
    Various shots of seed maize from Greytown in South Africa. This commodity is badly needed by farmers - as well as fertilisers which is flowing in at the rate of 2,000 tonnes per day 1/2 At least farmers can have a sigh of relief.


    6.
    Various shots seed maze heaped up in bags.


    7.
    Long shots of a warehouse used temporarily be the National Milling company. Here workers are seen offloading soyabean, peanut flour and fishmeal, all these required badly for stockfeeds.


    8.
    Various shots of South African railway waggons in big shed.


    9.
    Railways official inspecting progress of off-loading


    10.
    Various workers bringing bags of raw materials for stock feeds to a waiting trailer.




    Initials JS/2110



    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: Badly-needed supplies of fertiliser and seed maize are moving into Zambia from South Africa via Rhodesia following Zambian President Kenneth Kaunda's decision earlier this month to open the railway line across the border with Rhodesia.

    SYNOPSIS: This particular load was being unshipped at East London on the Southern coast of South Africa. The decision to open the southern rail link has raised many difficult questions for black leaders in southern Africa. Zambia, President Kaunda said, was desperate. Because of hold-ups on its other links to ports in Tanzania and Mozambique, Zambia was without the fertiliser and seed for maize, which is the country's staple diet. Without supplies, this season's crop would be halved, bringing famine to the country.

    The decision, which observers considered was a difficult one for President kaunda to make, was all the more urgent because the crops is due to be planted during the nest few days. It has been more than five years since Zambia had closed its borders with Rhodesia, and the Fort Victoria Railway bridge had become an established scene of activity for those fighting Prime Minister Ian Smith's regime in Rhodesia.

    The leaders of Tanzania ad Mozambique are reported to have tried to get President Kaunda to change his mind, but they were unsuccessful. It was hoped that, after Zambia had received enough fertiliser for its crops the Southern rail link would be closed, but there no reports that his assurance has been forthcoming. President Kaunda's decision raised the question of 'Sanctions busting'.

    As a hard-line African nation standing against Smith's administration Zambia acknowledged the United Nations resolution calling for sanctions against Rhodesia. Although, Zambia is not trading directly, Rhodesia stands to make substantial hard-currency earnings from Zambia's freight costs. The hold-ups on Zambia's usual outlets have created other problems.

    Zambia has needed to sell its main export copper to pay for the fertiliser and seed and now copper supplies can move once again.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA8VUMCXU5W4I2KU0S4EQPXAPX5
    Media URN:
    VLVA8VUMCXU5W4I2KU0S4EQPXAPX5
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    19/10/1978
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:10:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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