• Short Summary

    WARSAW, GDANSK & NOWA HUTA POLAND

    Poland's communist authorities claimed a victory over the banned trade union solidarity on June 18.

  • Description

    WARSAW (NBC)
    1. GV Couple voting at polling station. 0.07
    2. CU PULL BACK TO GV Local government symbol on wall. 0.13
    3. GV & SV Government spokesman Jerzy Urban. (2 SHOTS) 0.20
    4. CUs Solidarity leaflet and Polish bank notes with solidarity messages on them. (2 SHOTS) 0.26
    NOWA HUTA (PRT)
    5. GVs Riot scenes. (8 SHOTS) 0.43
    WARSAW & GDANSK (NBC)
    6. SV Former spokesman for solidarity speaking. (SOT) 0.54
    7. SV Newsmen having their credentials checked. 1.01
    8. CU PULL BACK TO SV & SVs Lech Walesa visiting family of captured Solidarity man and walking out of church. (3 shots) 1.18
    9. GVs & SVs Solidarity supporters at church service. (4 SHOTS) 1.44
    TRANSCRIPT: FORMER SPOKESMAN FOR SOLIDARITY: (SEQ 6) "There are all sorts of problems for example, if you don't go to vote won't get a passport, your children won't get into universities."
    InitialsCC/JRS

    NOTE TO EDITORS: THIS STORY HAS COMMENTARY BY NBC REPORTER STAN BERNARD, WHICH MAY BE USED IF REQUIRED.
    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: WARSAW, GDANSK & NOWA HUTA POLAND

    Poland's communist authorities claimed a victory over the banned trade union solidarity on June 18. They claimed a majority of Poles had ignored a call by the union's underground leaders for a boycott of national elections. The secretary of the state-run Election commission, Edward Szymanski, said unofficial returns showed that more than 75 per cent of the country's 26 million eligible voters had cast ballots in elections for local councillors. The balloting was Poland's first since martial law was imposed and solidarity suppressed in December 1981. Underground union leaders had called for a boycott by issuing illegal leaflets and scribbling messages on bank notes. They hoped such a moved would show popular disapproval of policies. The only apparent trouble on polling day (June 17) occurred in the southern steel town of Nowa Huta, where Polish television showed youths throwing stones and chanting anti-government slogans. Government spokesman Jerzy Urban said about one thousand people had taken part in the protest. A former national spokesman for solidarity said any vote would be a vote for a repressive regime, and those who went to the polls would be voting out of their fear. The former leader of solidarity, Lech Walesa, told reporters he intended to go fishing instead of voting on polling day. In a Warsaw church, members of the congregation raised Solidarity crosses as a gesture of defiance against the government. Two candidates stood for every seat in the elections. The authorities claimed this made the whole procedure more democratic. However, all candidates were screened by officials from a Communist-dominated organisation which was set up in 1982 to improve dialogue between the government and Polish society.

    Source: NBC/PRT

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA90FONB0BGXFETFSKC9JAGRDTO
    Media URN:
    VLVA90FONB0BGXFETFSKC9JAGRDTO
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    18/06/1984
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:44:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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