• Short Summary

    In Spain, the recent decision by the Spanish parliament to hold a national referendum on whether to approve the final text of a proposed new democratic constitution has precipitated mass political lobbying.

  • Description

    1.
    GV Madrid street zoom into referendum poster on lamp-post
    0.05

    2.
    GV and CU (democratic centre union party) poster calling for yes vote (TWO SHOTS)
    0.13

    3.
    GV and CU government street poster announcing referendum (TWO SHOTS)
    0.18

    4.
    GV Socialist party poster calling for yes vote PAN TO extreme left party poster calling for abstention in referendum (TWO SHOTS)
    0.27

    5.
    CU abstention poster
    0.30

    6.
    GV wall of building zoom into right wing poster calling for no vote (THREE SHOTS)
    0.43

    7.
    GV bill board with various posters calling for abstention
    0.46

    8.
    SV and CU news stand selling referendum literature (TWO SHOTS)
    0.54

    9.
    CU man reading referendum advertisement in newspaper
    0.56

    10.
    CUS television advertisement informing the population of the referendum (TWO SHOTS)
    1.31



    Initials KM/2020



    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: In Spain, the recent decision by the Spanish parliament to hold a national referendum on whether to approve the final text of a proposed new democratic constitution has precipitated mass political lobbying. And there is ample evidence of conflicting political undercurrents to the proposed new constitution in the content of the various referendum posters which have appeared on Madrid's walls and bill boards.

    SYNOPSIS: The government has set December 6th as the date for the people of Spain to decide whether to approve the new constitution, -- a 169 article charter which defines Spain as a parliamentary monarchy with King Juan Carlos as head of state. And there are clear signs in the final weeks before the referendum, that reactions to the proposed constitution are still divided.

    Some political parties are calling on people to abstain in the forthcoming referendum, whereas others -- like the right wing Fuerza Nueva (New Force) Party -- urge for a 'No' vote, and consequent rejection of the new constitution. Even within the ruling Democratic Centre Union there is political disagreement.

    The decision to hold a referendum followed parliamentary approval of the new constitution, which was itself the culmination of 14 months of often bitter debate. The final draft -- acceptable to all parliamentary factions -- is intended to seal formally Spain's transition to democracy after the 40-year dictatorship of the late General Franco. In the run-up to the referendum ample provision has been made for parliamentary parties to express their views to the public. Free time on national radio and television networks has been set aside for party political appeals, for announcements explaining the various articles of the new constitution, and to advise Spaniards of their democratic right to vote and vote freely.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA99H62LE7RQ928JNP3KER8H8Z6
    Media URN:
    VLVA99H62LE7RQ928JNP3KER8H8Z6
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    22/11/1978
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:31:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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