• Short Summary

    In Thailand, a government spokesman has said Vietnamese forces have withdrawn back to kampuchea after the limited attack on border villages.

  • Description

    1.
    GV PAN Palm tree and market scene in Phnom Penh
    0.07

    2.
    CU Bins of grain for sale in street market
    0.11

    3.
    SV PAN From vegetables on sale to fabrics on display
    0.18

    4.
    CU Money changing hands over sacks of grain (2 shots)
    0.31

    5.
    GV AND CU People in market place (3 shots)
    0.45

    6.
    CU Woman using sewing machine in the market
    0.51

    7.
    SV PAN From people eating at open air tables TO passersby
    1.04

    8.
    LV AND CU Woman checking grain as sacks are off-loaded from lorry and carried into warehouse (3 shots)
    1.26

    9.
    SV AND CU Women carrying baskets on their heads past fabric stall in market (2 shots)
    1.37

    10.
    CU AND SV Youth watches as grain is poured into sacks (3 shots)
    1.50

    11.
    LV People walking in street
    1.57




    Initials dn/





    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: In Thailand, a government spokesman has said Vietnamese forces have withdrawn back to kampuchea after the limited attack on border villages. Thailand had claimed 2,000 regular Vietnamese troops had attacked encampments of Kampuchean refugees on the eastern Thai border and had then intruded further into Thailand. Announcing their withdrawal on Tuesday (24 June), the spokesman said Thailand did not plan to stop the repatriation of Kampuchean refugees which had apparently prompted the attack. The increased tension along the border has placed an added strain on the international relief organisations anxious to help the Kampucheans overcome their chronic food shortage.

    SYNOPSIS: For many Kampucheans, the capital, Phnom Penh, is the favoured city ... the place where all the necessities of life are readily available. Here grain, rice, dried fish, even fruit and vegetables are all openly on sale, although much of it is smuggled from the Thai border area, where it has been issued by relief agencies. The Vietnamese-backed Government, in a move to boost morale, decided recently to reintroduce currency to replace the barter system. In Phnom Penh, at least, money is circulating, and people are receiving salaries for the first time in five years. Even the banks had been abolished under the Pol pot regime.

    Many of the goods for sale have come in from Vietnam. Others have been recycled after being abandoned by those who were forced to leave the city when the Khmer Rouge took over. But with money and plentiful supplies of food available, the people are flooding back. Members of international relief organisations who have visited Kampuchea recently have noted the streams of people leaving the countryside. This is adding to the country's problems as it struggles to rebuild its rural economy after more than ten years of war, revolution and famine.

    Relief experts have said Kampuchea, given some measure of stability, could become self-sufficient in its two main food items, rice and fish, within two or three years. But three is criticism of the regime in Phnom Penh. Its alleged that thousands of tons of seed rice are being boarded in the city instead of being distributed to farmers. So, while the future appears uncertain for those who live in the country, Phnom Penh flourishes.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA9CN8JI06YB8NCBEULWLQWT8QR
    Media URN:
    VLVA9CN8JI06YB8NCBEULWLQWT8QR
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    25/06/1980
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:58:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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