• Short Summary

    Uganda's main tribe, the Baganda, comprising nearly a third of the country's population, are rejoicing at the overthrow of President Obote, who forced their traditional Kabaka (ruler), Sir Edward Mutesa, to flee the country in 1966.

  • Description

    1.
    GTV Kampala
    0.03

    2.
    CU Sign Kasubi Tombs
    0.06

    3.
    GV Hut at entrance to tombs
    0.10

    4.
    CU Tombstone of Sir Daudi Chawall
    0.14

    5.
    MV Kabaka's widows singing
    0.13

    6.
    MV Women clapping and singing (2 shots)
    0.27

    7.
    SV Portrait of Kabaka
    0.29

    8.
    MV Women singing and dancing and clapping (2 shots
    0.38

    9.
    SV Baskets containing coins
    0.42

    10.
    MV Widow with stuffed cheetah
    0.46

    11.
    SV Kabaka's followers beating royal drums
    0.50

    12.
    GV & SV Kabaka's followers dancing and singing (3 shots)
    1.05

    13.
    SV Drumming
    1.09

    14.
    GV Villagers dancing
    1.18

    15.
    MV PAN Ditto
    1.28


    KAMPALA: OLD TOMB: KABAKA'S WIDOWS AND SUPPORTERS SINGING AND DANCING AND BEATING THE ROYAL DRUMS (NATURAL SOUND ON FILM)




    Initials JMR/DW/VH/1530 JMR/DW/VH/1608



    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: Uganda's main tribe, the Baganda, comprising nearly a third of the country's population, are rejoicing at the overthrow of President Obote, who forced their traditional Kabaka (ruler), Sir Edward Mutesa, to flee the country in 1966. The Kabaka died in exile in London. On Saturday (30 January 1971) his widows and followers rejoiced in their former palace, where no filming was allowed during President Obote's rule.

    The Baganda plan to petition Uganda's new ruler, Major-General Idi Amin, for restoration of the Kabakaship. This was abolished along with the country's three other kingdoms -- Toro, Ankole and Bunyoro -- when Mr. Obote seized complete power. Before then the Kabaka, known overseas as King Freddie, had been the country's constitutional President.

    Most of the political prisoners released in the past week are Baganda. They and thousands of others of their tribesmen have flocked to the former royal palace and once more members of the Royal Family are living in their old home. The old royal drums, once heard by early European explorers like Spoke and Stanley, have been beating out again.

    Uganda's first Prime Minister, Mr. Benedict Kiwanuka, who was detained without trial by Mr. Obote, was released last week. He is now talking of reviving his old Democratic Party and of campaigning to become Uganda's next elected President. The Baganda also hope to re-open their old Parliament, the Lukiko.

    The question of who would be the next Kabaka is an open one. Sir Edward Mutesa's eldest son, Prince Mutebi, aged 14, is at school in Britain. But he would not automatically become Kabaka. This choice is in the hands of the elders of the tribe.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA9LXHL7KV5J7DE0VQTRAG83C2G
    Media URN:
    VLVA9LXHL7KV5J7DE0VQTRAG83C2G
    Group:
    Reuters - Including Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    31/01/1971
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:28:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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