• Short Summary

    BLUEFIELD, NICARAGUA

    Troops of the ruling Sandinista government have arrived in Bluefield, the largest town on Nicaragua's Atlantic coast, to protect the residents from rebel attacks.

  • Description

    1. GV & SVs Boat full of Miskito Indians arriving at port of Bluefield on Nicaragua Atlantic Coast and disembarking on to quay (10 shots) 0.41
    2. GVs Street scenes of Bluefield showing poverty, posters, of revolutionary Nicaragua on wall (4 shots) 0.55
    3. GV Port and ships in harbour in Bluefield 0.58
    4. GV Sign in Spanish reading 'death to the invader' 1.01
    5. GVs and CU (TRAVELLING SHOT) Sunken ships in harbour (3 shots) 1.15
    6. GV TOP VIEW Small village near Bluefield that is being protected from the Contras (2 shots) 1.19
    7. GV & SV Village life, women and children (2 shots) 1.29
    8. SV PAN DOWN Children watching as Sandinista soldier cleans weapon (3 shots) 1.45
    9. GV & SVs People queuing up to eat from government supplied food on plate (6 shots) 2.10
    10. GV PAN Children playing by river and swimming (3 shots) 2.25
    11. GVs Soldiers on dockside mounting guard (5 shots) 2.55
    InitialsJT/PM


    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: BLUEFIELD, NICARAGUA

    Troops of the ruling Sandinista government have arrived in Bluefield, the largest town on Nicaragua's Atlantic coast, to protect the residents from rebel attacks. Until a few months ago, the effects of the Sandinista revolution, which marked its fifth anniversary on July 19 with celebrations in Managua, appeared to have by-passed the town, which is mostly populated by Miskito Indians. However, in recent weeks, Contra rebel forces have mounted an attempt to gain control of the town by mining the approaches to the port, and occupying an island four kilometres (two and a half miles) offshore for a few days before government troops regained control of it. In April, a Nicaraguan patrol boat sank while trying to de-fuse rebel mines near the town. The Miskitos initially appeared apathetic towards the Sandinista administration but more recently the presence has led to an increase in tension in the town. The residents are relatively remote from Managua as there are few roads and no direct highway to the capital, the Miskito Indians travel mainly by boat. In September 1982, the UNHCR (United Nations High Commission for Refugees) magazine reported that in the early months of the year, about ten thousand Nicaraguan Miskitos fled across the border to their kin communities in Honduras in protest at the Managuan authorities' efforts to extend influence in Bluefield, notably over education and other services.

    Source: REUTERS - ERICO ZAS CANO

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA9OU1PK2QRSJBGXFYB2PFFM5I5
    Media URN:
    VLVA9OU1PK2QRSJBGXFYB2PFFM5I5
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    20/07/1984
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:55:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

Comments (0)

We always welcome comments and more information about our films.
All posts are reactively checked. Libellous and abusive comments are forbidden.

Add your comment