• Short Summary

    When the communist forces of Mao Tse-Tung won the civil war in China in 1949 most of the General Chiang Kai-shek's nationalist forces fled to Taiwan.

  • Description

    1.
    CU: reporter Gary Neat speaking to camera.
    0.24

    2.
    LV: village huts in north western Thailand (3 shots)
    0.38

    3.
    SV: Chinese in village (2 shots)
    0.50

    4.
    SV: child making purchases from shop.
    0.56

    5.
    SV: village activity (2 shots)
    1.09

    6.
    SV: children in village.
    1.15

    7.
    CU: pictures of Chiang??? Kai-shek and his army (2 shots)
    1.33

    8.
    SV AND CU: children in classroom with teacher. (4 shots)
    2.03

    9.
    SV AND CU: young men talking in village.
    2.14

    10.
    SV PAN DOWN FROM: Chinese writing to man smoking opium pipe (2 shots)
    2.27

    11.
    LV: people at entrance to village.
    2.32


    NEAT: "The 93rd Kuomintang division has been arousing hostility in this part of the world ever since it was driven out of China, by the Communists 28 years ago. Four obvious reasons, no nation wanted a fully armed and very independent army division within its borders and certainly, over the years, these fears have been well founded. The 93rd division is now located in 11 separate villages throughout the remote ???hills of northwestern Thailand. The Thai government has banned foreigners from entering the camps because of what it describes as the delicate situation. In fact the ABC was the first foreign news organisation ever to film inside this settlement about 900 kilometres (560 miles) north of Bangkok. After year os??? heavy involvement in the opium trade suspicion has become a way of life for the former Kuomintang soldiers and their families. It was the drug trafficking that finally saw Burmese forces drive the 93rd division into Thailand in 1956. Altogether there are now more than 11,000 of the Chinese living in Thailand. An extremely high birth rate has ensured their survival even though many of the former soldiers have been killed over the years. Most still dream of one day returning to China. In fact, it was this dream which originally led to involvement in the opium trade as a means of raising funds for survival and re-armament. Part of the antagonism towards the 93rd divisions due to their strong sense of independence... All of these children continue to speak Chinese.... few can speak Thai. Only recently has the Thai government achieved real success in confiscating the division's weapons. But, because the Kuomintang are fiercely anti-communist and because their camps are situated in communist areas Thailand has re-issued many of the Chinese with light weapons for self defence. Very few young men were in evidence in this settlement near the Burmese border. Questions as to their whereabouts received evasive answers. The division's involvement in the opium trade is officially a thing of the past. Certainly in Burma and Thailand the word Kuomintang has been synonymous with drug drafficking. Their leaders say all they now desire is peace and security.




    Initials RH/2300


    GARY NEAT

    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: When the communist forces of Mao Tse-Tung won the civil war in China in 1949 most of the General Chiang Kai-shek's nationalist forces fled to Taiwan. But the 93rd nationalist army division was forced into northern Burma and now, after 28 nomadic years of fighting and drug trafficking, the nationalist Chinese soldiers and their families at last seem to be accepting their fate. The Australian Broadcasting Commission's Gary Beat reports.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA9V0XULHCPN9U9F5CAGXF32IZC
    Media URN:
    VLVA9V0XULHCPN9U9F5CAGXF32IZC
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    10/07/1977
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:31:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

Comments (0)

We always welcome comments and more information about our films.
All posts are reactively checked. Libellous and abusive comments are forbidden.

Add your comment