• Short Summary

    INTRODUCTION: U.S. Deputy Secretary of State, William Clark has met South African leaders for talks on moves towards independence for South African ruled Namibia (South West Africa).

  • Description

    1.
    SV INTERIOR Prime Minister's residence in Cape Town Prime Minister P.W. Botha greets U.S. delegation
    0.39

    2.
    SV U.S. Deputy Secretary of State, William Clark and P.W. Botha seated at table
    0.56

    3.
    SV INTERIOR Hotel. Mr. Clark and other officials
    1.05

    4.
    SCU Foreign Minister, Pik Botha speaking
    2.02


    SPEECH ON FILM (TRANSCRIPT)



    SEQ. 4: PIK BOTHA: "Our main purpose is to discuss matters concerning South West Africa, we're trying to find a way out of the impasse that was created months ago...so that's what we are busy doing and final point of detail and progress are all part of the general discussion that we are conducting..so that's all I can say."



    INTERVIEWER: "Mr. Botha, can these be regarded as substantial discussions or are they merely to prepare the ground for all-party talks like the Geneva ones?"



    FIX BOTHA: "No, these are substantial discussion between the South African government and the United States government to see where we agree or disagree in the process of trying to find a solution and this is a continuation of what I did in Washington, which was a continuation of what Dr. Crocker came to do here before. I went to Washington."





    Initials BB





    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: INTRODUCTION: U.S. Deputy Secretary of State, William Clark has met South African leaders for talks on moves towards independence for South African ruled Namibia (South West Africa). The American mission was at the direct request of President Reagan, who is known to be anxious that agreement be reached as soon as possible. The first stage of the trip took Mr. Clark to Cape Town.

    SYNOPSIS: The American mission was welcomed by Prime Minister Pieter Botha and other senior government officials at the Prime Minister's official residence. On his arrival in Cape Town, Mr. Clark repeated that the United States is not committed to any previous settlement plans for the disputed territory. A United Nations resolution calls for South Africa to agree to a ceasefire in the northern border guerrilla war, general elections and full independence -- all under United Nations supervision. An attempt to implement the plan last January collapsed, over South Africa's suspicion of U.N. impartiality in supervising elections.

    The day-along discussions started with a 'working-breakfast'. Officials later described the talks as frank if not encouraging. They said the topics covered included the Namibian problem and the possible future relationship between the Reagan Administration and Pretoria.

    Although Mr. Clark would not comment--saying he would first report to President Reagan--South African Foreign Minister Pik Botha, did talk to newsmen.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA9VUHEK3U9MDDGOSU07H5K5P2S
    Media URN:
    VLVA9VUHEK3U9MDDGOSU07H5K5P2S
    Group:
    Reuters - Including Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    12/06/1981
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:03:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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