• Short Summary

    Indonesia is suffering from a population explosion.

  • Description

    1.
    SV & GV Family planning clinic at Surabaya, Indonesia
    0.06

    2.
    SV Woman breast-feeding baby at clinic (2 shots)
    0.16

    3.
    SV Women with babies queuing inside waiting room
    0.24

    4.
    SV Woman undressing baby for doctor to examine (3 shots)
    0.40

    5.
    SV PAN Women placing contraceptives in bag and handing then to women
    0.53

    6.
    GV Village hall in Surabaya with womens meeting (3 shots)
    1.04

    7.
    SV PAN Protein food on display
    1.12

    8.
    SV & CU Small child being weighed (3 shots)
    1.20

    9.
    SV Protein foods being handed out to children
    1.25

    10.
    GV Slum area in Jakarta (4 shots)
    1.42

    11.
    GV & SV Clinic in Jakarta (2 shots)
    1.47

    12.
    SV Patients in waiting room and woman having blood pressure taken (2 shots)
    1.54

    13.
    SV PAN From nurses talking to patients about contraception
    2.00

    14.
    SV Woman being wheeled from operating theatre and lying in bed after sterilisation operation
    2.11




    Initials AM/





    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: Indonesia is suffering from a population explosion. Forecasts predict well over two hundred million people will be living on the islands by the year 2000. The Government has tried re-locating families on the more remote islands. That's met with limited success and so widespread contraception is being introduced in an attempt to tackle the problem.

    SYNOPSIS: In Surabaya, on the island of Java, family planning is proving to be just as important as on any one of Indonesia thirteen-and-a-hair thousand islands. To look at a map, Indonesia doesn't appear to have much of a population problem. And with 140 million people to cover islands, running three thousand miles from east to west, one would imagine land would not be lacking. But to a large extent this is so.

    Indonesia's birth control programme has been among the most successful in the Third World. Of the twenty five million fertile women, seventy percent use the contraceptive pill, which young women start at the age of fifteen.

    The statistics of the programme, started here in Java ten years ago, are impressive, and other Third World countries, have sent teams to study their methods. Child care, in the order of things, precedes politics or philosophy. Medicines and pesticides save many Indonesian babies from death at birth. Indonesia's population is expected to reach two hundred and twenty four million by the year two thousand.

    However, the intake of protein and calories among the population is less than it was in 1960. Flu, dysentery, tuberculosis and cholera is rising. In Jakarta the police regularly move in to tear down slum dwellings, and move people out to the city limits. Re-settlement is another way of relieving the pressure on the capital.

    At the Raden Seleh Clinic, the birth control programme is discussed with young women, and without sterilisation, forced or not as in India, it's been very successful.

    Village headmen sound daily drums to remind women to take the pill, while other opt for sterilisation. It seems to have come too late though. President Sukarno's plan to re-locate families to other islands has failed. It's proved an expensive failure.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA9YRC9XODY03PPQU3EK5BAM5WX
    Media URN:
    VLVA9YRC9XODY03PPQU3EK5BAM5WX
    Group:
    Reuters - Including Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    07/10/1980
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:11:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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