• Short Summary

    During the Organisation of Petroleum Exporting Countries--OPEC--conference in Qatar earlier this month Iran was one of the leading "hawk" countries demanding a maximum increase in the price of oil.

  • Description

    1.
    SV Oil waste burning from oil plant in Ahwaz, Iran (2 shots)
    0.05

    2.
    CU Oil rig and drill revolving (3 shots)
    0.13

    3.
    SV Crew working on rigging
    0.18

    4.
    GV Oil installations
    0.21

    5.
    SV ZOOM OUT FROM Workers at oil plant TO tall chimneys
    0.27

    6.
    SV Men working on scaffolding on cement complex in Tabriz (3 shots)
    0.34

    7.
    GV An identical plant under construction (5 shots)
    0.48

    8.
    CU F14 fighter taxiing down runway and taking off (4 shots)
    1.14

    9.
    GV Helicopters on tarmac
    1.17

    10.
    CU Helicopter and GV helicopter flying over airfield (2 shots)
    1.26

    11.
    GV Technicians working on helicopters (4 shots)
    1.39

    12.
    GV Oil plant and cement factory (4 shots)
    1.49

    13.
    SV INT Men bagging cement and cement on conveyor belt
    1.55



    Initials BB/1600



    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: During the Organisation of Petroleum Exporting Countries--OPEC--conference in Qatar earlier this month Iran was one of the leading "hawk" countries demanding a maximum increase in the price of oil. A look at the present level of industrialisation and military spending in the country shows why Iran is hungry for every cent of oil money it can come by.

    SYNOPSIS: Because with Iran's ruler, the Shah, steering the course, the race is on to industrialise the country before the oil runs out. To achieve this objective Iran is spending every oil dollar it earns. In fact, this year, it has actually gone into debt--by more than a billion U.S. dollars.

    This means that Iranian oil, unlike Arab oil, does not contribute to the West's balance of payments problem. And that's one reason why Iranian officials feel that have cause to complain--as they see their development plans shrink because of Western inflation. This cement complex, built by a Danish company, is typical of the problem. One plant finished last year cost 25 million U.S. dollars. But a new, identical plant now going up will cost 50 per cent more.

    The reasons for this is that the cost of machinery has gone sky high over the past few years. And machinery is mainly what Iran is importing. Iranian officers allege that prices for military hardware from the United States--like this new F-14 fighter-bomber for example--have gone crazy, with increase coming every few months and--on some items--every few weeks. The price of a new F-14 went up this month by six per cent, without any new gadgetry.

    Iran's army has an enormous helicopter programme--and here again costs have risen sharply. One project went up by 27 per cent this month and almost 50 per cent during the past year. Spare parts have also become much more expensive--with prices on some items rising by as much as two thousand per cent this year. As a result Iran is looking elsewhere for weapons--even the Soviet Union.

    But prices have gone up every-where. However, Iran hopes to be finished with oil price haggling within 20 years--by cutting off oil exports entirely. By then its reserves will be dwindling, but the hope is that industrialisation will be paid for.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA9ZP1BTT7ME59M6J452QFG7CAD
    Media URN:
    VLVA9ZP1BTT7ME59M6J452QFG7CAD
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    29/12/1976
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:56:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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