• Short Summary

    Crowds of people turned out on Tuesday (7 October) to attend the funeral in Jerusalem of an Israeli woman killed in the Paris synagogue bombing last Friday (3 October).

  • Description

    1.
    SV Place de la Concorde PAN crowds in streets.
    0.06


    2.
    SV Crowds demonstrating (4 SHOTS)
    0.50


    3.
    GV French President Valery Giscard d'Estaing speaking in French.
    1.26



    Jerusalem



    4.
    GV Crowds mourning.
    1.36


    5.
    SV Mourners praying and sharing grief. (4 SHOTS)
    1.52


    6.
    SV Mourners placing wreaths on grave. (3 SHOTS)
    2.08


    7.
    GV Mourners CU mourners round grave. (2 SHOTS)
    2.18




    Initials JS/



    TELERECORDING

    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: Crowds of people turned out on Tuesday (7 October) to attend the funeral in Jerusalem of an Israeli woman killed in the Paris synagogue bombing last Friday (3 October). The recent wave of neo-Nazi violence in Europe has unified the country in a way not seen since the Yom Kippur war seven years ago. Feelings in France too have been whipped up.

    SYNOPSIS: On Tuesday about twenty thousand people marched through the Place de la Concorde in Paris to protest against the bomb attack that killed four people outside a synagogue. The march along the traditional May Day route was organised by Socialist, Communist and left-wing radical parties as well as trade union and human right groups. But many Jewish organisations said they would not take part because the event was politically partisan. Some Jewish leaders said sympathy for their community over the bombing was linked to next spring's Presidential election where even marginal block votes could make the difference. Many have described the march as an anti-Government rally because of Communist and Socialist participation. The Government was not represented although President Valery Giscard d'Estaing later called for unity among French people. He said that French Jews were no different from any other group in French society.

    The President said it was his constant concern that Jewish people were treated in France as french while at the same time given the freedom to practise their religion as they wished like any other religious minority. Three extra companies of riot police were rushed to Paris on Saturday (4 October) to reinforce police guards on Jewish institutions. The police have been under criticism for not taking neo-nazi groups seriously over past months.

    Meanwhile in Jerusalem thousand s of people turned out at the funeral of one of the bomb victims on Tuesday (7 October). In contrast to the anger in Paris there was open grief here. Most Israelis are convinced that there is a direct link between Arab terrorism and the Neo-Nazi groups although no convincing evidence has yet been offered. The Israeli Parliament has also been critical of the French Government for failing to deal with terrorist threats against Jews. Jewish leaders have called on Jews to avoid reprisals which they say might harm innocent people.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVAAA2IYOFISD22MC42O339YLRE6
    Media URN:
    VLVAAA2IYOFISD22MC42O339YLRE6
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    08/10/1980
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:18:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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