• Short Summary

    In Poland, four weeks of torrential rain, which produced some of the worst flooding in memory, has threatened the country's harvest of oats, barley and rye.

  • Description

    1.
    AERIAL VIEW Flooded farmland in Poland.
    0.06

    2.
    GV Tractor moving across partly-flooded field.
    0.10

    3.
    SV Workers cutting corn with scythes. (3 SHOTS)
    0.27

    4.
    CU Farmers examining wet corn.
    0.32

    5.
    GV Combine harvester stuck in mud being pulled out by tractor PAN TO farmers and harvesters at roadside.
    0.48

    6.
    CU Harvester cutting corn and families stacking it.
    1.00

    7.
    CU Spinning tractor wheel.
    1.04

    8.
    CU Harvester moving along and grain being loaded on to trucks. (3 SHOTS)
    1.14

    9.
    GV Tractor towing loaded waggons.
    1.19

    10.
    CU PULL OUT TO SV Tractor towing animal fodder harvester. (2 SHOTS)
    1.30

    11.
    GV Waggons arriving at laboratory for drying.
    1.41




    Initials JS/





    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: In Poland, four weeks of torrential rain, which produced some of the worst flooding in memory, has threatened the country's harvest of oats, barley and rye. Altogether, floodwaters inundated three and three quarter million acres of land, including at least a million acres (405,000 hectares) being cultivates on some forty-one-thousand farms.

    SYNOPSIS: Persistent rain brought a three-week delay, which meant the harvesting haymaking, sowing of second summer crops, and cultivating fields for winter crops, had to be done in half the usual time. The legacy of mud and damp grain compounded the worries. heavy combine machines could not come into some areas, so lighter reaping equipment, mowers and even scythes had to be used.

    Wed corn, such as this, had to be sent away for drying.

    Despite delays for rescuing heavy machines trapped in mud, farm workers mainly using scythes and horse-drawn machines, harvested more than one-and-a quarter million acres (500,000 hectares) of grain, and almost three-quarters of a million acres (300,000 hectares) of grassland in a week. At the same time, they managed to get in the already-mown grain from about three-hundred-and-seventy thousand acres (150,000 hectares), and almost four hundred thousand acres (160,000 hectares) of hay.

    The rain stopped in time to save rye crops, but experts said root crops could be in danger. To guard against possible shortage of animal fodder, farmers got busy sowing second crops. Grain of all kinds was sent to drying plants, including those in sugar factories, and anxiously checked for humidity.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVAAC4SZL1V1KL2CL4NDUBWH4GRL
    Media URN:
    VLVAAC4SZL1V1KL2CL4NDUBWH4GRL
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    18/08/1980
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:41:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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