• Short Summary

    Children, the innocent victims of war and political purges, often find themselves homeless and without parents.

  • Description

    1.
    GV Front view of orphanage at Kompong Kantout.
    0.07

    2.
    CU Flags of Kampuchea and Hungary flying at masthead, sign above orphanage entrance.(2 shots)
    0.14

    3.
    SV INTERIOR Teacher at blackboard PAN TO orphans sitting on floor in classroom. (3 shots)
    0.34

    4.
    SV Teacher in another classroom with orphans seated at desks.
    0.42

    5.
    SV Boy in dormitory drawing picture of Lenin.
    0.54

    6.
    CU Bullet and shell scars on damaged building. (3 shots)
    1.10

    7.
    GV Hungarian workers and local builders tilting roof of newly built section of orphanage.(2 shots)
    1.24

    8.
    SV Two Hungarian workers laying rafters on roof.(3 shots)
    1.41

    9.
    CU ZOOM OUT FROM Hungarian writing on boxes of tiles.
    1.50

    10.
    GV PAN New buildings at orphanage.
    2.03

    11.
    GV Orphanage building at Phnom Penh.
    2.09

    12.
    GV Orphans playing football, basketball, and handball.(5 shots)
    2.45

    13.
    SV INTERIOR Boys in dormitory, sitting on bed, reading books, others at table.(2 shots)
    2.58

    14.
    SV Girls sewing and knitting.(2 shots)
    3.11

    15.
    SV Children playing musical instruments.(3 shots)
    3.36

    16.
    SV Orphans in national costume performing traditional dance to music.
    4.15




    Initials Rdel/BB





    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: Children, the innocent victims of war and political purges, often find themselves homeless and without parents. This has been the tragedy of Kampuchea. During the Khmer Rouge regime of Pol Pot (1975-79), tens of thousands of people were murdered a most of the population in the cities forced from their homes. The fighting between Kampuchean guerrillas and the Vietnamese troops supporting the Heng Samrin government has also claimed the lives of countless civilians.

    Care of orphan children is a mammoth task in Kampuchea, but one of the authorities are tackling with aid from other countries. This is the orphanage at Kompong Kantout, 35 kilometres (22 miles) from the capital, Phnom Penh. Its rebuilding and extension programme cares for about 350 children, aged between six and 16 years. It is their home, school, playground and for the moment their avenue back to a normal lifestyle. The student orphans study in classrooms that still bear the scars of war, but that situation is being corrected. Twenty Hungarian tradesmen are assisting local workers rebuild and extend the orphanage. Hungary has allocated approximately three million dollars to enlarge the complex so it can cater for one thousand children.

    In Phnom Penh, 474 orphans live at this centre. They too enjoy a varied curriculum and are encouraged to take part in sporting activities. The children at this orphanage range in ages from six to 15 and most lost their parents during the Pol Pot regime, either killed or missing believed dead. Some educational supplies come from the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) and the British aid organisation Oxfam has donated a car. The main support however, comes from the Kampuchean government which allocates seven dollars, 50 for each child on a monthly basis. It's a labour-of-love caring for the orphans of Kampuchea, but the well-being and happiness of these children repays many times over those involved in this special work.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVAAL84JQBGQT0WPVFXEGUZN6605
    Media URN:
    VLVAAL84JQBGQT0WPVFXEGUZN6605
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    11/03/1983
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:04:16:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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