• Short Summary

    The body of the late President Josip Tito has been lying in state in the Yugoslav capital of Belgrade.

  • Description

    1.
    GV People queuing to pass President Tito's bier in Belgrade.
    0.21

    2.
    TV Tito's closed coffin with people filling past.
    0.26

    3.
    GV Assembly with Yugoslav leaders listening of en???gy.
    0.37

    4.
    CU Bronze head of younger Tito.
    0.46

    5.
    LV Dr. Vladimir Bakaric addressing Assembly.
    1.01

    6.
    GV Assembly.
    1.12

    7.
    CU Bookstore window with book by Tito and photograph of Tito.
    1.17

    8.
    SV Men selling newspapers. (2 SHOTS)
    1.23

    9.
    CU AND PULL BACK TO Taxi.
    1.30

    10.
    SV Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev and Foreign Minister Andrei Gromyko being greeted.
    1.41

    11.
    CU Picture of Tito with flag.
    1.44

    12.
    SV Brezhnev signing guest book.
    1.46

    13.
    GV Group of visiting officials.
    1.47

    14.
    SV Mr. Gromyko signing book.
    1.50

    15.
    SCU Mr. Brezhnev.
    1.54

    16.
    SV Soviet Premier Alexei Kosygin signing book.
    1.57

    17.
    SV Brezhnev surrounded by officials.
    1.58

    18.
    GV Young Yugoslavs in uniform and officials in Assembly.
    2.26

    19.
    SV General Mikola Ljubicic addressing Assembly.
    2.46


    Reuters quoted diplomatic sources as saying that there would be informal talks among visiting heads of state and other leaders before and after the funeral. They expected prominent issues of discussion to include Afghanistan, Iran, the Arab-Israeli conflict and the deterioration in Soviet-American relations. President Carter had sent Vice-President Walter Mondale to represent the United States. But the presence of China's Chairman Hua Gefend was said to underscore Mr. Carter's absence, which had drawn critical comment in British newspapers.





    Initials JS/



    TELERECORDING

    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: The body of the late President Josip Tito has been lying in state in the Yugoslav capital of Belgrade. Reuters news agency says his funeral on Thursday (8 May) would marked one of the largest gatherings of international leaders in history. They were expected to hold major talks during their stay in Yugoslavia.

    SYNOPSIS: Thousands of people have been filing past the bier holding the coffin of the architect of modern Yugoslavia -- the wartime guerrilla who had ruled the country for thirty-give years. Although a very old man at eighty-seven, President Tito had lingered seriously ill for almost four months after having a leg amputated last January.

    On Tuesday (6 May), Yugoslavia's entire leadership and top officials held a special commemorative meeting in the Federal Parliament building, where the body was lying in state. It had been brought there the previous day from the northern city of Ljub???jana, where President Tito had died on Sunday (4 May).

    Dr. Vladimir Bakaric, a long-standing friend of the dead President, spoke one of the eulogies. He said Yugoslavia was determined to maintain its independence, and to follow the path laid down by Tito. The gathering was made up of all members of the collective state and Communist Party presidencies which Tito had set up to take over after his death.

    Now that Tito has gone, he has become further entrenched in Yugoslav legend. Nationwide mourning has gripped the people, for millions of whom he was the only national leader they every knew. A pillar of certainty has been removed from their midst.

    Soviet President Leonid Brezhnev and Foreign Minister Andrei Gromyko are greeted as they in Belgrade. Diplomatic circles had buzzed at the news of Mr. Brezhnev's visit, because his health had been considered too frail. Reuters said his presence would give the Kremlin a diplomatic point over President Carter, who had chosen not to come.

    Prime Minister Alexei Kosygin was also in the Soviet party.

    Young Yugoslavs were on hand to pay their respects. Their leaders have been stressing that Moscow has previously pledged to respect Yugoslavia's right to go its own way, as it has done since it broke from the Soviet bloc in 1948. They fear that the Soviet Union will try to draw Yugoslavia back into its embrace.

    General Mikola Ljubicic reminded the Assembly of their dead leader's stature and influence. Political observers expect his successors to keep on stressing Yugoslavia's need for vigilance and self-reliance to preserve the unity that President Tito had maintained in almost four decades as their guiding spirit.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVAALZQGSD1BZ3G9R4K0W4F1AJMF
    Media URN:
    VLVAALZQGSD1BZ3G9R4K0W4F1AJMF
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    06/05/1980
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:46:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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