• Short Summary

    TAIJI AND TOKYO, JAPAN/AT SEA

    For a thousand years Japanese fishermen ventured out from whaling ports like Taiji on the Pacific coast in the search for the ocean's largest prey.

  • Description

    TANAKA, JULY 17, 1984
    1. GVs Taiji whaling port, sculpture of whale, small boat (3 shots) 0.13
    FILE (NHK)
    2. SV Dead whales being towed into harbour 0.18
    3. SVs Fishermen pulling whales up on to banks and cutting them up (3 shots) 0.27
    4. GVs and SVs Whalemeat being processed in factory (2 shots) 0.32
    5. GV Whalers at sea firing harpoon at whales in Antarctic, whale being pulled into factory ship hull (10 shots) 1.17
    6. GV Deck of factory whaling ship, whale carcass being cut and processed on board ship (4 shots) 1.28
    TANAKA, JULY 17, 1984
    7. GV & SV Restaurant in Tokyo which serves whalemeat, meat being cooked, customers eating whale dishes (10 shots) 1.57
    FILE (NHK)
    8. GV Harpoon being fired at whale 2.06
    InitialsJT/PM


    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: TAIJI AND TOKYO, JAPAN/AT SEA

    For a thousand years Japanese fishermen ventured out from whaling ports like Taiji on the Pacific coast in the search for the ocean's largest prey. Only twenty years ago, some 200,000 tonnes of whalemeat was produced annually by the thriving Japanese whale catching and processing industry. By 1982 output had slumped to one-tenth of that figure as Japanese eating habits changed and international efforts to preserve whale species led to strict catch quotas. Now the International Whaling Commission (IWC), set up to save the whale by scientific monitoring of stocks and the setting of quotas, has approved a five-year moratorium from 1986 on all commercial whaling. Japan, the Soviet Union and Norway, who between them account for 70 per cent of all whale catches, have made formal objections to the decision, which was made at last month's IWC conference in Buenos Aires. For Japan, the moratorium virtually ensures the end for the country's fast-declining whaling industry, which now provides full-time work for only about 1,300 people-most of them in fishing villages like Taiji where life has centered on whaling for generations. The end of commercial whaling, or a temporary halt if stocks are judged by the IWC to have recovered by 1991, poses no serious economic problems for Japan. But for many Japanese, the ban represents an attack on the country's traditions and eating habits. Whalemeat, as served at Tokyo's well-known Kujiraya restaurant, is considered a delicacy and 300 customers a day cram into the establishment to enjoy a wide range whale dishes. Restaurant manager, Tanahashi San, plans to buy extra supplies before the moratorium takes effect and says he will hope for the best. Japan could ignore the IWC decision, which is not binding, and quit the organisation. However the Tokyo government is thought unlikely to follow such a defiant course, fearing commercial retaliation from a variety of countries where the whale conservation lobby has exercised pressure.

    Source: REUTERS - KIMIAKI TANAKA AND NHK

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVAASFW1CMB8AJ5F3IP1IR6G6H08
    Media URN:
    VLVAASFW1CMB8AJ5F3IP1IR6G6H08
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    20/07/1984
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:07:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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