• Short Summary

    President Richard Nixon, in a well-received address before a joint session of the Canadian Parliament in Ottawa on Friday (14 April), said the world's major powers could agree to limit arms, but this would not bring peace if the aggressive use of existing weapons was encouraged.

  • Description

    1.
    GV EXT. Parliament buildings, Ottawa.
    0.03

    2.
    SV Mounties on duty (2 shots)
    0.13

    3.
    SV Crowd watches
    0.16

    4.
    SV President Nixon and Mr. Trudeau enter Parliament building.
    0.26

    5.
    SV INT. Nixon and Trudeau through foyer. (2 shots)
    0.40

    6.
    SV & CU Nixon and Trudeau seated during meeting (4 shots)
    0.53

    7.
    TOP SHOT Pres. Nixon - Parliament rise to Nixon and applaud.
    0.56

    8.
    SCU Nixon speaks in French and applauded (2 shots)
    1.15

    9.
    SV PAN parliament applauds.
    1.18

    10.
    SCU Nixon speaks
    1.47


    SOF BEGINS: "To all of you who..."



    SOUND END: ...Canadian accent.


    11.
    GV Members applaud and laugh.
    1.50


    NIXON: "To all of you who have welcomed Mrs. Nixon and me so warmly on this occasion, I trust you will give me allowances for trying to speak in the language that I studied 37 years ago. When I tried it today before I came on, our top linguist in the American government, General Walters, he said, "Go ahead. You speak French with a Canadian accent."




    Initials VS/21.33 VS/22.33


    THE PART SOUND ON FILM IS A PORTION OF MR. NIXON'S REMARKS TO PARLIAMENT. A TRANSCRIPT FOLLOWS:
    TELERECORDING

    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: President Richard Nixon, in a well-received address before a joint session of the Canadian Parliament in Ottawa on Friday (14 April), said the world's major powers could agree to limit arms, but this would not bring peace if the aggressive use of existing weapons was encouraged.

    Speaking just over a month before his planned visit to Moscow, he said great powers must use their influence to halt aggression, not to encourage it. The President did not specifically mention the current North Vietnamese offensive against South Vietnam, but the U.S. Defence and State Departments have drawn attention to Hanoi's heavy reliance on Soviet weapons.

    Mr. Nixon and Canadian Prime Minister Pierre Elliott Trudeau, in a private meeting lasting almost tow hours earlier in the day, agreed to review their positions with the aim of breaking the current deadlock in trade negotiations between the two countries.

    Canadian authorities, apprehensive after the physical attack by a demonstrator on Soviet Premier Alexei Kosygin when he was in Ottawa last year, imposed the tightest security measures in the history of the Canadian capital for Mr. Nixon's visit.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVAAWMJT6VM3RVNPEBFJC1KSU9ZI
    Media URN:
    VLVAAWMJT6VM3RVNPEBFJC1KSU9ZI
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    15/04/1972
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:50:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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