• Short Summary

    Free-style skiing -- called " hot-dogging" by its detractors - has become the latest and fastest-growing winter sports craze in the United States.

  • Description

    1.
    GV Skiing resort
    0.05

    2.
    SV PAN Hot-dog skiers performing
    0.11

    3.
    GV Skier somer-saulting
    0.16

    4.
    GV PAN Skier doing double somersault
    0.27

    5.
    GV PAN Skier down course
    0.38

    6.
    GV & SV Crowd watch skier somer-saulting (4 shots)
    1.00

    7.
    GV Skiers up snow hill and turning in the air (3 shots)
    1.07

    8.
    GV Skier Somer-saulting
    1.12

    9.
    GV Skier twisting body in the air
    1.18

    10.
    GV PAN Skier in forward somersault
    1.25

    11.
    GV PAN Winner leaping in freestyle
    1.42

    12.
    GV Skiers demonstrate different styles (4 shots)
    1.50

    13.
    GV PAN Skiers up slops
    1.57


    TRANSCRIPT: DAVID NOLAN: "Free stylists don't relish being called hot-doggers. But, outside of insanity, there is no other way to describe flying through the air, performing stunts usually limited to diving boards. The goal is to reach the bottom--presumably without medical attention. A competitor can fall or even stop between the snow hills that serve as watching pads. But at some point he's got to land--and not necessarily on his skis. Freestyling leaped to attention in the early Seventies--a response in part to death-defying demolition derbies...but not self-destructive. It's pure Americana--born and bred in the mountains of Aspen, Colorado, with a devoted following that jumps from one event to another while the snow lasts. Nervousness is as prevalent at a free-style competition as plaster at a convention of orthopaedic surgeons. In the Men's National at Stowe, Vermont, thirty-five thousand dollars in prize money was up for grabs. And that pays a lot of doctors' bills....runs are judged on the basis of composition and poise. Forward lunges turn into incredible flips. Skiers strain and twist their bodies, mimicking a helicopter but often resembling an octopus after electrical shock. In the men's results, Bob Young, out of Sun Valley, Idaho, the Cooperation of free-styling, racked up two hundred and eighty-one points, to take first place. Emil Dudneau, from Grand Tark, Idaho ... finished second. And last year's champ, Bob Salerno, also of Sun Valley, finished third."




    Initials BB/2327 PS/PN/BB/2347


    SPORT: SKIING
    TELERECORDING
    This film is serviced with a commentary by TVN reporter David Nolan, which is for use.

    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: Free-style skiing -- called " hot-dogging" by its detractors - has become the latest and fastest-growing winter sports craze in the United States.

    Its appeal, according to those who have come to revel in it, lies in its total freedom from all the traditional and accepted rules of skiing. Free-style means exactly that -- the skier gets to the bottom of the course any way he wants to, or can. He can fall, pause or even stop altogether on the way there, but so long as he eventually reaches the bottom he's achieved his objective.

    Free-style has its beginnings in the mountains around Aspen, Colorado, but now it's spread to virtually all the country's ski slopes. It's even become organised to the extent of national competitions -- the most recent of which, the U.S. Men's National, was held at Stowe, Vermont.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVAB4U4WSD1DY0ALAU5JUN22QPXR
    Media URN:
    VLVAB4U4WSD1DY0ALAU5JUN22QPXR
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    26/01/1975
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:57:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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